Direct and Indirect Interventions for Cognitive-Communication Disorders of Dementia The dementia syndrome is characterized by cognitive and behavioral deficits that affect daily life functioning, including communication. Speech-language pathologists (SLPs) will see increased numbers of adults with dementia in the coming years, as the incidence and prevalence of diseases that cause dementia continue to grow. In this article, the authors ... Article
Article  |   October 01, 2015
Direct and Indirect Interventions for Cognitive-Communication Disorders of Dementia
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Tammy Hopper
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB
  • Natalie Douglas
    Department of Speech-Language Pathology, Central Michigan University, Mount Pleasant, MI
  • Becky Khayum
    MemoryCare Corporation, Aurora, IL
  • Financial Disclosure: Tammy Hopper a professor at the University of Alberta. Natalie Douglas is an assistant professor at Central Michigan University. Becky Khayum is president of MemoryCare Corporation and a speech-language pathologist.
    Financial Disclosure: Tammy Hopper a professor at the University of Alberta. Natalie Douglas is an assistant professor at Central Michigan University. Becky Khayum is president of MemoryCare Corporation and a speech-language pathologist.×
  • Nonfinancial Disclosure: Tammy Hopper has previously published in the subject area. Natalie Douglas has previously published in the subject area. Becky Khayum has previously published in the subject area.
    Nonfinancial Disclosure: Tammy Hopper has previously published in the subject area. Natalie Douglas has previously published in the subject area. Becky Khayum has previously published in the subject area.×
Article Information
Special Populations / Older Adults & Aging / Language Disorders / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Articles
Article   |   October 01, 2015
Direct and Indirect Interventions for Cognitive-Communication Disorders of Dementia
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, October 2015, Vol. 25, 142-157. doi:10.1044/nnsld25.4.142
History: Received May 8, 2015 , Revised August 18, 2015 , Accepted September 22, 2015
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, October 2015, Vol. 25, 142-157. doi:10.1044/nnsld25.4.142
History: Received May 8, 2015; Revised August 18, 2015; Accepted September 22, 2015

The dementia syndrome is characterized by cognitive and behavioral deficits that affect daily life functioning, including communication. Speech-language pathologists (SLPs) will see increased numbers of adults with dementia in the coming years, as the incidence and prevalence of diseases that cause dementia continue to grow. In this article, the authors provide an update on the syndrome of dementia and its most common cause, Alzheimer's disease. A framework for interventions is provided, along with a discussion of research evidence for specific treatment techniques. The article concludes with case studies of person-centered assessment and intervention for individuals with mild and moderate dementia severity.

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