Guest Editor Column Earlier in my career as a practicing clinician, a publication of Seminars in Speech and Language made a significant impact upon me. At the time, I worked both in a medical hospital setting and in a long-term care facility. In both settings, the main referrals received for persons ... Coordinator's Column
Coordinator's Column  |   October 01, 2015
Guest Editor Column
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Coordinator's Column
Coordinator's Column   |   October 01, 2015
Guest Editor Column
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, October 2015, Vol. 25, 123-124. doi:10.1044/nnsld25.4.123
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, October 2015, Vol. 25, 123-124. doi:10.1044/nnsld25.4.123
Earlier in my career as a practicing clinician, a publication of Seminars in Speech and Language made a significant impact upon me. At the time, I worked both in a medical hospital setting and in a long-term care facility. In both settings, the main referrals received for persons with dementia were swallowing evaluations. I knew there were needs that were being unmet in the areas of cognition and communication and sought information on how to provide a broader range of services to persons with cognitive-communicative disorders related to dementia. Two specific articles in that issue of Seminars opened my eyes to a wide array of viable interventions that could be included in the SLPs' clinical practice: Direct interventions for improving the performance of individuals with Alzheimer's disease (Mahendra, 2001) and indirect interventions to facilitate communication in Alzheimer's disease (Hopper, 2001). The work of Dr. Mahendra and Dr. Hopper led to a thirst to read the original literature on the interventions used for individuals with dementia and to match the interventions to appropriate clients. When I transitioned to a university teaching position, I was thrilled to have the opportunity to expose my students to the multitude of possible interventions for cognitive-communication disorders associated with dementia and to create service learning opportunities through which students could implement them.
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