Patient Reported Outcome Measures in Neurologic Communication Disorders: An Update In her seminal book on outcome measurement in the field of communication disorders, Carol Frattali (1998)  set the path for outcomes research and clinical application in the field of speech-language pathology. In particular, she defined the many possible outcomes that can be measured to examine the influence of an intervention ... Article
Article  |   June 01, 2015
Patient Reported Outcome Measures in Neurologic Communication Disorders: An Update
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Michael de Riesthal
    Department of Hearing and Speech Sciences, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN
  • Katherine B. Ross
    Department of Audiology and Speech Pathology, Phoenix VA Health Care System, Phoenix, AZ
  • Financial Disclosure: Michael de Riesthal is assistant professor of Hearing and Speech Sciences and director of Pi Beta Phi Rehabilitation Institute at Vanderbilt University. Katherine B. Ross is speech pathology section chief at Phoenix VA Health Care System.
    Financial Disclosure: Michael de Riesthal is assistant professor of Hearing and Speech Sciences and director of Pi Beta Phi Rehabilitation Institute at Vanderbilt University. Katherine B. Ross is speech pathology section chief at Phoenix VA Health Care System.×
  • Nonfinancial Disclosure: Michael de Riesthal has previously published in the subject area. Katherine B. Ross has previously published in the subject area.
    Nonfinancial Disclosure: Michael de Riesthal has previously published in the subject area. Katherine B. Ross has previously published in the subject area.×
Article Information
Research Issues, Methods & Evidence-Based Practice / Language Disorders / Aphasia / Articles
Article   |   June 01, 2015
Patient Reported Outcome Measures in Neurologic Communication Disorders: An Update
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, June 2015, Vol. 25, 114-120. doi:10.1044/nnsld25.3.114
History: Received March 12, 2015 , Revised April 13, 2015 , Accepted April 27, 2015
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, June 2015, Vol. 25, 114-120. doi:10.1044/nnsld25.3.114
History: Received March 12, 2015; Revised April 13, 2015; Accepted April 27, 2015

In her seminal book on outcome measurement in the field of communication disorders, Carol Frattali (1998)  set the path for outcomes research and clinical application in the field of speech-language pathology. In particular, she defined the many possible outcomes that can be measured to examine the influence of an intervention and the ways in which these measures can inform public policy. Of these, patient or client centered measures, which index outcome based on the patient's and family's or caregiver's perspective, have received increasing attention in recent research and clinical practice. These measures examine a variety of patient reported outcomes (PRO) associated with health. PRO measures are being used more commonly in clinical practice and as end points in medical and rehabilitation outcomes research. This perspective reflects the shift in medicine and rehabilitation toward patient-centered care. In this article, we will examine the rationale for using PRO measures, the advantages and challenges for using these tools, and current use of PRO measures in neurological communication disorders.

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