Guest Editor's Column While the prescription and administration of therapeutic pharmaceutical agents falls outside of the scope of practice of speech-language pathologists (SLPs; American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, 2007), clinicians working with people with neurogenic disorders of speech and language must be concerned with the effects of medications on cognitive-communicative performance. And whereas these ... Coordinator's Column
Coordinator's Column  |   April 01, 2015
Guest Editor's Column
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Coordinator's Column
Coordinator's Column   |   April 01, 2015
Guest Editor's Column
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, April 2015, Vol. 25, 44-46. doi:10.1044/nnsld25.2.44
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, April 2015, Vol. 25, 44-46. doi:10.1044/nnsld25.2.44
While the prescription and administration of therapeutic pharmaceutical agents falls outside of the scope of practice of speech-language pathologists (SLPs; American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, 2007), clinicians working with people with neurogenic disorders of speech and language must be concerned with the effects of medications on cognitive-communicative performance. And whereas these medications often have the desired effects of treatment, alleviation, and/or prevention of disease, they can also be accompanied by potentially adverse collateral consequences, including side effects that may impact speech and language. As SLP's, we are primarily concerned with the effects that these medications may have on treatment planning, counseling and education, and interdisciplinary collaboration. Because new drugs and novel— possibly “off-label”— uses of drugs are continually developed and administered, clinicians should be acquainted with the most up-to-date evidence on indications and side-effects of relevant medications. In this this issue of Perspectives, four articles have been assembled to explore and underscore crucial pharmacological issues in the treatment and clinical management of various populations with cognitive-communication impairments.
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