Treatment for Lexical Retrieval in Primary Progressive Aphasia In recent years there has been an increase in research describing the behavioral characteristics and underlying pathology of primary progressive aphasia (PPA). One of the earliest and most prominent features of PPA, particularly for the logopenic and semantic variants, is anomia, and this is often the symptom that prompts individuals ... Article
Article  |   October 01, 2014
Treatment for Lexical Retrieval in Primary Progressive Aphasia
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Kindle Rising
    Department of Speech, Language and Hearing Sciences, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ
  • Financial Disclosure: Kindle Rising is a Research Speech-Language Pathologist at the University of Arizona. This work was supported by the grant RO1DC007646-08 (Developing an Evidence-Based Treatment Continuum for Spoken and Written Language) from the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders. The author's position as a research speech-language pathologist is funded by this grant.
    Financial Disclosure: Kindle Rising is a Research Speech-Language Pathologist at the University of Arizona. This work was supported by the grant RO1DC007646-08 (Developing an Evidence-Based Treatment Continuum for Spoken and Written Language) from the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders. The author's position as a research speech-language pathologist is funded by this grant.×
  • Nonfinancial Disclosure: Kindle Rising has previously published in the subject area.
    Nonfinancial Disclosure: Kindle Rising has previously published in the subject area.×
Article Information
Special Populations / Older Adults & Aging / Normal Language Processing / Language Disorders / Aphasia / Articles
Article   |   October 01, 2014
Treatment for Lexical Retrieval in Primary Progressive Aphasia
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, October 2014, Vol. 24, 137-144. doi:10.1044/nnsld24.4.137
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, October 2014, Vol. 24, 137-144. doi:10.1044/nnsld24.4.137

In recent years there has been an increase in research describing the behavioral characteristics and underlying pathology of primary progressive aphasia (PPA). One of the earliest and most prominent features of PPA, particularly for the logopenic and semantic variants, is anomia, and this is often the symptom that prompts individuals with PPA to seek treatment. However, speech-language pathologists who encounter individuals with PPA on their clinical caseloads often have questions about how best to manage progressive language decline in these patients. A small body of literature suggests that treatment for anomia in PPA is indeed warranted, and that item-specific improvement can be expected for a majority of individuals receiving treatment. Although generalization and maintenance of treatment gains are variable in the face of progressive decline, there are some emerging themes as to treatment approaches and patient characteristics that may promote more generalized and relatively durable treatment outcomes. Ultimately, treatment that engages residual semantic, phonologic and orthographic skills, using both strategic training and stimulation, may be appropriate for PPA patients with mild-moderate anomia.

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