Considerations in Subtyping and Monitoring of Symptom Progression in Primary Progressive Aphasia A speech-language pathologist (SLP) may be one of the initial clinical providers for a patient with primary progressive aphasia (PPA), a group of neurodegenerative diseases involving the selective, progressive deterioration of speech and/or language abilities. While the three primary subtypes of PPA have distinct profiles of language preservation and impairment, ... Article
Article  |   October 01, 2014
Considerations in Subtyping and Monitoring of Symptom Progression in Primary Progressive Aphasia
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Daisy Sapolsky
    Frontotemporal Dementia Unit, Departments of Psychiatry and Speech and Language Pathology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Charlestown, MA
  • Kimiko Domoto-Reilly
    Frontotemporal Dementia Unit, Departments of Psychiatry and Speech and Language Pathology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Charlestown, MA
  • Bradford C. Dickerson
    Frontotemporal Dementia Unit, Departments of Neurology and Psychiatry, Massachusetts Alzheimer's Disease Research Center, Charlestown, MA
    Athinoula A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA
  • Financial Disclosure: Daisy Sapolsky has no financial interests to disclose. Kimiko Domoto-Reilly has no financial interest to disclose. Bradford C. Dickerson has no financial interest to disclose.
    Financial Disclosure: Daisy Sapolsky has no financial interests to disclose. Kimiko Domoto-Reilly has no financial interest to disclose. Bradford C. Dickerson has no financial interest to disclose.×
  • Nonfinancial Disclosure: Daisy Sapolsky has no nonfinancial interest related to the content of this article. Kimiko Domoto-Reilly has no nonfinancial interest related to the content of this article. Bradford C. Dickerson has no nonfinancial interest related to the content of this article.
    Nonfinancial Disclosure: Daisy Sapolsky has no nonfinancial interest related to the content of this article. Kimiko Domoto-Reilly has no nonfinancial interest related to the content of this article. Bradford C. Dickerson has no nonfinancial interest related to the content of this article.×
Article Information
Special Populations / Older Adults & Aging / Language Disorders / Aphasia / Articles
Article   |   October 01, 2014
Considerations in Subtyping and Monitoring of Symptom Progression in Primary Progressive Aphasia
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, October 2014, Vol. 24, 122-127. doi:10.1044/nnsld24.4.122
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, October 2014, Vol. 24, 122-127. doi:10.1044/nnsld24.4.122

A speech-language pathologist (SLP) may be one of the initial clinical providers for a patient with primary progressive aphasia (PPA), a group of neurodegenerative diseases involving the selective, progressive deterioration of speech and/or language abilities. While the three primary subtypes of PPA have distinct profiles of language preservation and impairment, the process of identifying the subtype can be challenging for many reasons, including subtle initial symptoms which can be difficult to detect on standard testing batteries. Early and accurate subtyping is important for clinical and research applications, which we will discuss here. The SLP plays a critical role in the initial subtyping process, as well as in helping to confirm that the course and presentation are consistent with a root diagnosis of PPA, as opposed to normal aging or other etiologies. The involvement of the SLP over time then focuses on monitoring symptom severity and progression, which is a particularly relevant issue for this population. The SLP can apply this information to inform treatment planning and patient/family counseling, and to assess potential benefits from interventions including conventional and novel speech therapies, and pharmaceutical treatments as they become available.

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