Facilitating Life Participation in Severe Aphasia with Limited Treatment Time Although the recovery course of severe aphasia is typically much lengthier and more protracted than other forms of aphasia, availability of treatment time is often quite limited. Focusing on one or more specific language domains, such as auditory comprehension, may be indicated. When treatment time is limited, however, progress in ... Article
Article  |   June 01, 2014
Facilitating Life Participation in Severe Aphasia with Limited Treatment Time
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jacqueline Hinckley
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, University of South Florida, Petersburg, FL
  • Financial Disclosure: Jacqueline Hinckley is Associate Professor Emeritus at the University of South Florida.
    Financial Disclosure: Jacqueline Hinckley is Associate Professor Emeritus at the University of South Florida.×
  • Nonfinancial Disclosure: Jacqueline Hinckley has previously published in the subject area.
    Nonfinancial Disclosure: Jacqueline Hinckley has previously published in the subject area.×
  • Content in this article was presented as part of a SIG 2 Invited Seminar at the ASHA Convention, Chicago, 2013.
    Content in this article was presented as part of a SIG 2 Invited Seminar at the ASHA Convention, Chicago, 2013.×
Article Information
Language Disorders / Aphasia / Articles
Article   |   June 01, 2014
Facilitating Life Participation in Severe Aphasia with Limited Treatment Time
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, June 2014, Vol. 24, 89-99. doi:10.1044/nnsld24.3.89
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, June 2014, Vol. 24, 89-99. doi:10.1044/nnsld24.3.89

Although the recovery course of severe aphasia is typically much lengthier and more protracted than other forms of aphasia, availability of treatment time is often quite limited. Focusing on one or more specific language domains, such as auditory comprehension, may be indicated. When treatment time is limited, however, progress in an impairment-focused approach may be insufficient to affect the individual's daily life. This paper provides a process for selecting a daily activity, targeting that activity in a participation-focused intervention, and measuring progress when treatment time is limited. Case examples illustrate the process. A focus on even one activity that occurs daily can provide ongoing opportunities for practice and interaction in spite of ongoing treatment.

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