Multiple Memory Systems and Their Support of Language There is a long history of research linking the various forms of memory to different aspects of language. Clinically, we see this memory-language connection in the prevalence of language and communication deficits in populations that have concomitant impairments in memory and learning. In this article, we provide an overview of ... Article
Article  |   April 01, 2014
Multiple Memory Systems and Their Support of Language
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jake Kurczek
    Neuroscience Graduate Program, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA
  • Natalie Vanderveen
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA
  • Melissa C. Duff
    Department of Neurology, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA
  • Financial Disclosure: Jake Kurczek is a Graduate Research Assistant at the University of Iowa. Natalie Vanderveen is a Graduate Research Assistant at the University of Iowa. Melissa C. Duff is an Assistant Professor at the University of Iowa.
    Financial Disclosure: Jake Kurczek is a Graduate Research Assistant at the University of Iowa. Natalie Vanderveen is a Graduate Research Assistant at the University of Iowa. Melissa C. Duff is an Assistant Professor at the University of Iowa.×
  • Nonfinancial Disclosure: Jake Kurczek has previously published in the subject area. Natalie Vanderveen has no nonfinancial interests related to the content of this article. Melissa C. Duff has previously published in the subject area.
    Nonfinancial Disclosure: Jake Kurczek has previously published in the subject area. Natalie Vanderveen has no nonfinancial interests related to the content of this article. Melissa C. Duff has previously published in the subject area.×
Article Information
Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Articles
Article   |   April 01, 2014
Multiple Memory Systems and Their Support of Language
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, April 2014, Vol. 24, 64-73. doi:10.1044/nnsld24.2.64
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, April 2014, Vol. 24, 64-73. doi:10.1044/nnsld24.2.64

There is a long history of research linking the various forms of memory to different aspects of language. Clinically, we see this memory-language connection in the prevalence of language and communication deficits in populations that have concomitant impairments in memory and learning. In this article, we provide an overview of how the demands of language use and processing are supported by multiple memory systems in the brain, including working memory, declarative memory and nondeclarative memory, and how disruptions in different forms of memory may affect language. While not an exhaustive review of the literature, special attention is paid to populations who speech-language pathologists (SLPs) routinely serve. The goal of this review is to provide a resource for clinicians working with clients with disorders in memory and learning in helping to understand and anticipate the range of disruptions in language and communication that can arise as a consequence of memory impairment. We also hope this is a catalyst for more research on the contribution of multiple memory systems to language and communication.

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