Fractionation of Memory in Patient Populations: A Memory Systems Perspective Memory complaints and impairments characterize a number of different neurological and neurodegenerative disorders. Exactly how these impairments manifest (e.g., the type of memory that is affected, the severity of the deficit, whether the impairment is temporally-limited or extensive) can vary considerably across patient populations and depends upon which memory systems ... Article
Article  |   April 01, 2014
Fractionation of Memory in Patient Populations: A Memory Systems Perspective
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Elaine J. Mahoney
    Department of Psychology, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI
  • Deborah E. Hannula
    Psychology Department, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI
  • Financial Disclosure: Elaine J. Mahoney is a Graduate Student at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. Deborah E. Hannula is an Assistant Professor at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee.
    Financial Disclosure: Elaine J. Mahoney is a Graduate Student at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. Deborah E. Hannula is an Assistant Professor at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee.×
  • Nonfinancial Disclosure: Elaine J. Mahoney has no nonfinancial interests related to the content of this article. Deborah E. Hannula has previously published in the subject area.
    Nonfinancial Disclosure: Elaine J. Mahoney has no nonfinancial interests related to the content of this article. Deborah E. Hannula has previously published in the subject area.×
Article Information
Special Populations / Older Adults & Aging / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Articles
Article   |   April 01, 2014
Fractionation of Memory in Patient Populations: A Memory Systems Perspective
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, April 2014, Vol. 24, 50-63. doi:10.1044/nnsld24.2.50
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, April 2014, Vol. 24, 50-63. doi:10.1044/nnsld24.2.50

Memory complaints and impairments characterize a number of different neurological and neurodegenerative disorders. Exactly how these impairments manifest (e.g., the type of memory that is affected, the severity of the deficit, whether the impairment is temporally-limited or extensive) can vary considerably across patient populations and depends upon which memory systems or brain structures have been compromised. Following some historical context and a brief overview of the multiple memory systems perspective, several conditions with memory deficit as a primary or secondary symptom are described (i.e., MTL amnesia, diencephalic amnesia, Alzheimer's disease, semantic dementia, and Parkinson's disease). Patterns of spared and impaired performances across conditions are compared, and the pathological profiles of each disorder are summarized. It is concluded that while neuropsychological studies support the multiple memory systems perspective, they have also been instrumental in shaping our ever-evolving views of how brain systems support memory and how they interact.

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