Training-the-Trainer on Assistive Technology for Cognition (ATC): Current Practices Research shows that if clinicians are to deliver effective, evidence-based assistive technology for cognition (ATC) services to clients with acquired brain injury (ABI), they first need opportunities to gain knowledge and experience with ATC assessment and training practices (O'Neil-Pirozzi, Kendrick, Goldstein, & Glenn, 2004). This article describes three examples of ... Article
Article  |   June 01, 2013
Training-the-Trainer on Assistive Technology for Cognition (ATC): Current Practices
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Laurie Ehlhardt Powell
    Shepherd Center, Atlanta, GA
  • Tracey Wallace
    Acquired Brain Injury Program, Coastline Community College ID4theWeb, Newport Beach, CA
  • Michelle ranae Wild
    University of Oregon, Center on Brain Injury Research and Training, Eugene, OR
  • Disclosure: Laurie Ehlhardt Powell has no financial or nonfinancial relationships related to the content of this article.
    Disclosure: Laurie Ehlhardt Powell has no financial or nonfinancial relationships related to the content of this article.×
  • Disclosure: Tracey Wallace has no financial or nonfinancial relationships related to the content of this article.
    Disclosure: Tracey Wallace has no financial or nonfinancial relationships related to the content of this article.×
  • Disclosure: Michelle R. Wild has written a book related to the use of smart devices as cognitive prosthetics and receives royalties from the sales of the book.
    Disclosure: Michelle R. Wild has written a book related to the use of smart devices as cognitive prosthetics and receives royalties from the sales of the book.×
Article Information
Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Traumatic Brain Injury / Articles
Article   |   June 01, 2013
Training-the-Trainer on Assistive Technology for Cognition (ATC): Current Practices
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, June 2013, Vol. 23, 90-94. doi:10.1044/nnsld23.2.90
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, June 2013, Vol. 23, 90-94. doi:10.1044/nnsld23.2.90

Research shows that if clinicians are to deliver effective, evidence-based assistive technology for cognition (ATC) services to clients with acquired brain injury (ABI), they first need opportunities to gain knowledge and experience with ATC assessment and training practices (O'Neil-Pirozzi, Kendrick, Goldstein, & Glenn, 2004). This article describes three examples of train the trainer materials and programs to address this need: (a) a toolkit for trainers to learn more about assessing and training ATC; (b) a comprehensive, trans-disciplinary program for training staff to provide ATC services in a metropolitan area; and (c) an overview of an on-site/online training package for rehabilitation professionals working with individuals with ABI in remote locations.

Become a SIG Affiliate
Pay Per View
Entire SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders content & archive
24-hour access
This Issue
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access
We've Changed Our Publication Model...
The 19 individual SIG Perspectives publications have been relaunched as the new, all-in-one Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups.