Assistive Technology for Cognition: Perspectives on Funding Physical and occupational therapists commonly provide services that incorporate prosthetic and orthotic devices such as crutches, canes, reachers, and ankle–foot orthoses to support mobility and activities of daily living (ADLs). Likewise, speech-language pathologists provide services incorporating prosthetic devices to support communication such as an electrolarynx, microcomputers, and mobile devices and ... Article
Article  |   June 01, 2013
Assistive Technology for Cognition: Perspectives on Funding
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Kathy de Domingo
    Progressive Rehabilitation Associates, Portland, OR
  • Disclosure: Kathy de Domingo has no financial or nonfinancial relationships related to the content of this article.
    Disclosure: Kathy de Domingo has no financial or nonfinancial relationships related to the content of this article.×
Article Information
Practice Management / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions
Article   |   June 01, 2013
Assistive Technology for Cognition: Perspectives on Funding
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, June 2013, Vol. 23, 84-89. doi:10.1044/nnsld23.2.84
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, June 2013, Vol. 23, 84-89. doi:10.1044/nnsld23.2.84

Physical and occupational therapists commonly provide services that incorporate prosthetic and orthotic devices such as crutches, canes, reachers, and ankle–foot orthoses to support mobility and activities of daily living (ADLs). Likewise, speech-language pathologists provide services incorporating prosthetic devices to support communication such as an electrolarynx, microcomputers, and mobile devices and apps with voice output capability. Assistive technology for cognition (ATC) includes the use of personal digital assistants (PDAs), tablets, and smart phones — cognitive prostheses — to compensate for cognitive challenges following acquired brain injury (ABI). Whereas funding sources for devices and services that support/compensate for mobility, ADLs, and communication challenges are generally well established, funding for ATC devices and services is relatively new to the field of speech-language pathology. This article explores the funding aspect of ATC devices and services.

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