Assistive Technology for Cognition Following Brain Injury: A Clinician's Perspective Whether working in a specialized brain injury program, outpatient clinic, acute care hospital, or private practice, speech-language pathologists serving adults with cognitive impairments due to acquired brain injury (ABI) are faced with many challenges: assessment, treatment planning, client and family education, documentation, team conferences, and billing. The combination of these ... Article
Article  |   June 01, 2013
Assistive Technology for Cognition Following Brain Injury: A Clinician's Perspective
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Mary Pat Daly
    Brain Injury Rehabilitation Center, Brain Injury Rehabilitation Center, Portland, OR
  • Disclosure: Mary Pat Daly has no financial or nonfinancial relationships related to the content of this article.
    Disclosure: Mary Pat Daly has no financial or nonfinancial relationships related to the content of this article.×
Article Information
Telepractice & Computer-Based Approaches / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Traumatic Brain Injury / Articles
Article   |   June 01, 2013
Assistive Technology for Cognition Following Brain Injury: A Clinician's Perspective
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, June 2013, Vol. 23, 74-83. doi:10.1044/nnsld23.2.74
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, June 2013, Vol. 23, 74-83. doi:10.1044/nnsld23.2.74

Whether working in a specialized brain injury program, outpatient clinic, acute care hospital, or private practice, speech-language pathologists serving adults with cognitive impairments due to acquired brain injury (ABI) are faced with many challenges: assessment, treatment planning, client and family education, documentation, team conferences, and billing. The combination of these demands requires a high level of efficiency. Include the rapidly expanding field of assistive technology for cognition (ATC) — cell phones, smart phones, tablets, and apps used to compensate for cognitive impairments — and the most experienced and adept clinician can feel overwhelmed. This article describes the practical application of ATC assessment and training in the brain injury day treatment program at the Brain Injury Rehabilitation Center (BIRC), Portland, OR, across three domains: (a) a clinician’s perceptions of ATC and its integration into clinical practice, (b) selected ATC assessment processes and training techniques, and (c) challenges associated with the implementation of ATC in a clinical setting.

Become a SIG Affiliate
Pay Per View
Entire SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders content & archive
24-hour access
This Issue
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access
We've Changed Our Publication Model...
The 19 individual SIG Perspectives publications have been relaunched as the new, all-in-one Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups.