Neurologic Substrates of Motor Speech Disorders A good clinical understanding of the neurologic substrates of neurologic communicative disorders is important both to diagnosis and treatment. This article briefly reviews neurologic substrates for motor speech disorders (MSD) and how clinicians may identify neurologic signs and symptoms to facilitate differential diagnosis of apraxia of speech (AOS) and the ... Article
Article  |   October 01, 2013
Neurologic Substrates of Motor Speech Disorders
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Edythe A. Strand
    Department of Neurology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota
  • Financial Disclosure: Edythe Strand is a consultant in the Division of Speech Pathology, Department of Neurology at the Mayo Clinic, and a Professor in the Mayo Medical School.
    Financial Disclosure: Edythe Strand is a consultant in the Division of Speech Pathology, Department of Neurology at the Mayo Clinic, and a Professor in the Mayo Medical School.×
  • Nonfinancial Disclosure: Edythe Strand has previously published in the subject area.
    Nonfinancial Disclosure: Edythe Strand has previously published in the subject area.×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody
Article   |   October 01, 2013
Neurologic Substrates of Motor Speech Disorders
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, October 2013, Vol. 23, 98-104. doi:10.1044/nnsld23.3.98
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, October 2013, Vol. 23, 98-104. doi:10.1044/nnsld23.3.98

A good clinical understanding of the neurologic substrates of neurologic communicative disorders is important both to diagnosis and treatment. This article briefly reviews neurologic substrates for motor speech disorders (MSD) and how clinicians may identify neurologic signs and symptoms to facilitate differential diagnosis of apraxia of speech (AOS) and the various types of dysarthria.

Students and clinicians have numerous resources regarding general neuroanatomy and neurophysiology (e.g. Benarroch, 2006; Kandel, Schwartz, and Jessel, 1991; Nolte, 2002; Snell, 1997) as well as neuroanatomic correlates of speech-language behavior and disorders (Bhatnagar, 2012; Duffy, 2013). Articles on aspects of neuroimaging (Brown, Petersen and Schlaggar, 2003; Shuster, 2003) and neurologic substrates for MSDs (Farinella-Bocian, Strand, and Benarroch, 2007) are also available in previous editions of Perspectives.

This article begins with an overview of the differing MSDs. A brief overview of neurologic systems is provided, followed by a more detailed description of the neurologic substrates for MSDs. Examples of clinical observations of speech and non-speech characteristics that can aid the clinician in understanding the underlying neural deficit are provided.

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