Advances in the Treatment for Acquired Apraxia of Speech Treatments for acquired apraxia of speech (AOS) have a modest, but growing evidence base. A substantial number of treatment investigations have been reported since the publication of the first AOS treatment guidelines (Wambaugh, Duffy, McNeil, Robin, & Rogers, 2006a; 2006b). The authors have provided an overview of more recent AOS ... Article
Article  |   October 01, 2013
Advances in the Treatment for Acquired Apraxia of Speech
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Julie Wambaugh
    VA Salt Lake City Health Care System, Salt Lake City, Utah
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah
  • Shannon Mauszycki
    VA Salt Lake City Health Care System, Salt Lake City, Utah
  • Kirrie Ballard
    (ARC) Future Fellow, University of Sydney, Australia
  • Financial Disclosure: Julie Wambaugh, is a Research Career Scientist at the VA Salt Lake City Health Care System and Professor in the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders. Shannon Mauszycki, is a Research Speech-Language Pathologist at the VA Salt Lake City Health Care System and a Department of Veterans Affairs Rehabilitation Research & Development Career Development-2 Awardee. Kirrie Ballard, is an Associate Professor and Australian Research Council (ARC) Future Fellow at The University of Sydney in Australia. All are members of the ANCDS AOS Guidelines Writing Committee.
    Financial Disclosure: Julie Wambaugh, is a Research Career Scientist at the VA Salt Lake City Health Care System and Professor in the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders. Shannon Mauszycki, is a Research Speech-Language Pathologist at the VA Salt Lake City Health Care System and a Department of Veterans Affairs Rehabilitation Research & Development Career Development-2 Awardee. Kirrie Ballard, is an Associate Professor and Australian Research Council (ARC) Future Fellow at The University of Sydney in Australia. All are members of the ANCDS AOS Guidelines Writing Committee.×
  • Nonfinancial Disclosure: Julie Wambaugh has previously published in the subject area. Shannon Mauszycki has previously published in the subject area. Dr. Wambaugh’s and Dr. Mauszycki’s work on this report was supported, in part, by VA Rehabilitation Research and Development. Kirrie Ballard has previously published in the subject area.
    Nonfinancial Disclosure: Julie Wambaugh has previously published in the subject area. Shannon Mauszycki has previously published in the subject area. Dr. Wambaugh’s and Dr. Mauszycki’s work on this report was supported, in part, by VA Rehabilitation Research and Development. Kirrie Ballard has previously published in the subject area.×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Apraxia of Speech & Childhood Apraxia of Speech
Article   |   October 01, 2013
Advances in the Treatment for Acquired Apraxia of Speech
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, October 2013, Vol. 23, 95-119. doi:10.1044/nnsld23.3.112
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, October 2013, Vol. 23, 95-119. doi:10.1044/nnsld23.3.112

Treatments for acquired apraxia of speech (AOS) have a modest, but growing evidence base. A substantial number of treatment investigations have been reported since the publication of the first AOS treatment guidelines (Wambaugh, Duffy, McNeil, Robin, & Rogers, 2006a; 2006b). The authors have provided an overview of more recent AOS treatment evidence, along with a description of important advances, emerging trends, and new directions in the treatment of AOS.

Become a SIG Affiliate
Pay Per View
Entire SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders content & archive
24-hour access
This Issue
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access
We've Changed Our Publication Model...
The 19 individual SIG Perspectives publications have been relaunched as the new, all-in-one Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups.