Evidence Supporting Dysarthria Intervention: An Update of Systematic Reviews Dysarthria represents a group of motor speech disorders (MSDs) characterized by weakness, slowness, and/or lack of coordination of the speech musculature as a result of damage to the nervous system. This article reviews the history of our attempt to provide an evidence base for dysarthria intervention, to describe some recent ... Article
Article  |   October 01, 2013
Evidence Supporting Dysarthria Intervention: An Update of Systematic Reviews
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Kathryn M. Yorkston
    Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, University of Washington-Seattle, Seattle, Washington
  • David R. Beukelman
    Department of Communication Disorders, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NE
  • Financial Disclosure: Kathryn M. Yorkston is a Professor and Head of the Division of Speech Pathology at the University of Washington, Seattle. David R. Beukelman is the Barkley Professor of Communication Disorder at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln.
    Financial Disclosure: Kathryn M. Yorkston is a Professor and Head of the Division of Speech Pathology at the University of Washington, Seattle. David R. Beukelman is the Barkley Professor of Communication Disorder at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln.×
  • Nonfinancial Disclosure: Kathryn M. Yorkston has previously published in the subject area. David R. Beukelman has previously published in the subject area.
    Nonfinancial Disclosure: Kathryn M. Yorkston has previously published in the subject area. David R. Beukelman has previously published in the subject area.×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Dysarthria / Research Issues, Methods & Evidence-Based Practice
Article   |   October 01, 2013
Evidence Supporting Dysarthria Intervention: An Update of Systematic Reviews
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, October 2013, Vol. 23, 105-111. doi:10.1044/nnsld23.3.105
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, October 2013, Vol. 23, 105-111. doi:10.1044/nnsld23.3.105

Dysarthria represents a group of motor speech disorders (MSDs) characterized by weakness, slowness, and/or lack of coordination of the speech musculature as a result of damage to the nervous system. This article reviews the history of our attempt to provide an evidence base for dysarthria intervention, to describe some recent efforts, and to propose some directions for the future. From 2001 to 2007, the Dysarthria Writing Committee published a series of 7 systematic reviews evaluating 333 articles focusing on specific components of speech production, such as velopharyngeal dysfunction, or intervention for specific conditions, such as spasmodic dysphonia. These reviews offer evidence for the benefits of dysarthria intervention for speakers with selected dysarthria characteristics. More recently, scoping reviews have been used to map areas of relevant literature on the topics of speech supplementation and intervention in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Two trends will influence the future: (a) the movement from evidence-based care to value-based care including evidence of intervention effectiveness, perceived value by the patients/clients and their families, and relative cost, and (b) the increasing availability of client report outcomes measures. These trends point to the need to incorporate client reports in our intervention studies by asking patient/client about the value of our interventions.

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