Report from the Consensus Development Conference on Rehabilitation of Persons With Traumatic Brain Injury The Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) Act of 1996 called for a national consensus conference on managing traumatic brain injury and related rehabilitation concerns. As a result, a Consensus Development Conference on Rehabilitation of Persons with Traumatic Brain Injury was held at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) from October 26–28, ... Article
Article  |   March 01, 1999
Report from the Consensus Development Conference on Rehabilitation of Persons With Traumatic Brain Injury
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Audrey L. Holland
    University of Arizona, Tucson
Article Information
Articles
Article   |   March 01, 1999
Report from the Consensus Development Conference on Rehabilitation of Persons With Traumatic Brain Injury
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, March 1999, Vol. 9, 2-4. doi:10.1044/nnsld9.1.2
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, March 1999, Vol. 9, 2-4. doi:10.1044/nnsld9.1.2
The Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) Act of 1996 called for a national consensus conference on managing traumatic brain injury and related rehabilitation concerns. As a result, a Consensus Development Conference on Rehabilitation of Persons with Traumatic Brain Injury was held at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) from October 26–28, 1998. The conference was sponsored by the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development and the Office of Medical Applications of Research and co-sponsored by a number of other Institutes, offices, agencies, and centers of NIH. The Conference brought together a group of national and international experts, as well as public representatives, who, for a day and a half, presented papers and statements intended to evaluate the scientific evidence concerning rehabilitation practices for persons with TBI. Particular emphasis was placed on practices related to the cognitive, behavioral, and psychosocial difficulties that may be associated with TBI across its range of severity. Following presentation of this information, an independent panel, chaired by Kristjan Ragnarsson, Professor of Rehabilitation Medicine at Mount Sinai School of Medicine, then weighed the scientific evidence and wrote a draft statement that took into account both the above testimony as well as their own review of the scientific literature that they had collected over the previous year. Two members of Division 2 participated formally in the Conference: Mark Ylvisaker provided expert testimony on rehabilitation intervention and I served as a member of the independent panel. Many other Division 2 members were in the audience for the deliberations. Following is a synopsis of the pertinent practice recommendations, research needs, and conference conclusions presented at a national press conference by the panel on October 28, 1998.
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