Cognitive Intervention Case Studies: A Case Study of Behavioral Intervention After Childhood Traumatic Brain Injury In an earlier issue of this news-letter (Ylvisaker & Feeney, 1998) and elsewhere (Feeney & Ylvisaker, 1997; Ylvisaker, 1998), Ylvisaker and colleagues described an approach to intervention for behavior disorders after traumatic brain injury (TBI). The approach is based on several premises: (a) frontal lobe and limbic system injury, ... Article
Article  |   December 01, 1998
Cognitive Intervention Case Studies: A Case Study of Behavioral Intervention After Childhood Traumatic Brain Injury
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Erika Reynolds
    Department of Communication Sciences, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio
  • Lyn Turkstra
    Department of Communication Sciences, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio
Article Information
Cognitive Intervention Case Studies
Article   |   December 01, 1998
Cognitive Intervention Case Studies: A Case Study of Behavioral Intervention After Childhood Traumatic Brain Injury
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, December 1998, Vol. 8, 6-10. doi:10.1044/nnsld8.4.6
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, December 1998, Vol. 8, 6-10. doi:10.1044/nnsld8.4.6
In an earlier issue of this news-letter (Ylvisaker & Feeney, 1998) and elsewhere (Feeney & Ylvisaker, 1997; Ylvisaker, 1998), Ylvisaker and colleagues described an approach to intervention for behavior disorders after traumatic brain injury (TBI). The approach is based on several premises: (a) frontal lobe and limbic system injury, common after TBI, may impair functions such as behavioral self-control and working memory, making it difficult for survivors to incorporate previous consequences into future behavior; (b) what is labeled inappropriate social behavior in reality may reflect underlying communication problems, so that behaviors—such as angry outbursts and failure to respond to instructions— in fact, may reflect difficulty with functions, such as understanding directions or using language to make requests; and (c) such individuals benefit from the construction of positive, antecedent- (rather than consequence-) supported, everyday routines, designed to capitalize on procedural learning and memory. For example, an individual with profound impairments in new learning, self-regulation, and expressive and receptive vocabulary would benefit from a predictable, highly transparent, daily routine that anticipates and avoids opportunities for frustration.
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