An Interview With Leonard L. LaPointe What attracted me to the field initially was a lecture given by a professor, the late Ralph Leutenegger, at Michigan State University during my freshman year back in the “Happy Days” of ‘57 Chevys and Tears on My Pillow. In a survey course on Communication Processes, representatives from divisions ... Article
Article  |   December 01, 1998
An Interview With Leonard L. LaPointe
Author Notes
  • Leonard L. LaPointeprofessor
  • Department of Speech and Hearing Science at Arizona State University in Tempe, is a 1998 recipient of the Honors of the Association.
    Department of Speech and Hearing Science at Arizona State University in Tempe, is a 1998 recipient of the Honors of the Association.×
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Article   |   December 01, 1998
An Interview With Leonard L. LaPointe
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, December 1998, Vol. 8, 2-4. doi:10.1044/nnsld8.4.2
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, December 1998, Vol. 8, 2-4. doi:10.1044/nnsld8.4.2
What attracted me to the field initially was a lecture given by a professor, the late Ralph Leutenegger, at Michigan State University during my freshman year back in the “Happy Days” of ‘57 Chevys and Tears on My Pillow. In a survey course on Communication Processes, representatives from divisions in the College of Communication Arts lectured to a group of about 300 first-year students on their particular specialties. Dr. Leutenegger lectured on speech problems and what can be done about them and invited any interested students to come to his office if they wanted more information on careers in this field. I did, and in the true sense of a good mentor, he explained with warmth and lots of war stories the qualifications, curriculum in speech-language pathology, and job opportunities. I knew then that this would be a challenging and fulfilling existence and promptly changed my major from Radio and TV to Speech Pathology. After graduating and working in the public schools of Menasha, Wisconsin, for 3 years, attending to the speech needs of students from kindergarten through high school, I decided to go to graduate school at the University of Colorado in Boulder. That is where I was introduced to clinical training in the hospitals of Denver and became immersed in learning about aphasia and neurological disorders of communication. Darrel Teter was one of my first clinical supervisors and at Rose Memorial Hospital, on my very first day, I was introduced to a 60 year-old minister with aphasia, a boy with a submucosal palatal cleft, a gentleman with Parkinson’s disease, a woman who had undergone surgery for a prefrontal lobe tumor, and two people with contact ulcers of the larynx. I was overwhelmed and exhilarated by all I didn’t know—and still am.
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