Motor Speech Case Study: The Use of Words Versus Nonwords in the Treatment of Apraxia of Speech: A Case Study The strategies for the rehabilitation of apraxia of speech are recent and strikingly few in number (Deal & Florance, 1978; Dworkin, Abkarian, & Johns, 1988; Florance, Rabidoux, & McCauslin, 1980; Hyland & McNeil, 1987; Rosenbek, Lemme, Ahern, Harris, & Wertz, 1973; Simmons, 1980; Southwood, 1987; Square, Chumpelik, Morning-star, & ... Article
Article  |   September 01, 1998
Motor Speech Case Study: The Use of Words Versus Nonwords in the Treatment of Apraxia of Speech: A Case Study
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Helen J. Kahn
    Northern Michigan University, Marquette, MI
  • Tracey Stannard
    Sundance Corporation, Rutland, VT
  • Jan Skinner
    Grand Isle Supervisory Union, Grand Isle, VT
Article Information
Articles
Article   |   September 01, 1998
Motor Speech Case Study: The Use of Words Versus Nonwords in the Treatment of Apraxia of Speech: A Case Study
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, September 1998, Vol. 8, 5-10. doi:10.1044/nnsld8.3.5-a
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, September 1998, Vol. 8, 5-10. doi:10.1044/nnsld8.3.5-a
The strategies for the rehabilitation of apraxia of speech are recent and strikingly few in number (Deal & Florance, 1978; Dworkin, Abkarian, & Johns, 1988; Florance, Rabidoux, & McCauslin, 1980; Hyland & McNeil, 1987; Rosenbek, Lemme, Ahern, Harris, & Wertz, 1973; Simmons, 1980; Southwood, 1987; Square, Chumpelik, Morning-star, & Adams, 1986; Stevens & Glaser, 1983). One reason for this paucity of rehabilitation strategies may be that there is little agreement as to the nature of apraxia of speech. On the one hand, there are researchers who advocate the theory that apraxia of speech is a deficit of motor speech control distinct and autonomous from any linguistic impairment (Darley, Aronson, & Brown 1985; Duffy, 1995; Wertz, LaPointe, & Rosenbek, 1991). On the other hand, Goodglass and Kaplan (1983) as well as others (Buckingham, 1987; Caplan, 1987) argue that apraxia of speech is one symptom of aphasia and that linguistic characteristics, such as word frequency or phonology, influence speech production in these patients.
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