Neurogenic Language Case Studies: One Approach to the Treatment of Anomia The cognitive neuropsychological approach to the study of language processing combines the investigation of normal performance with investigations of how brain damage may impair an individual’s ability to perform certain language tasks. Converging evidence from these two types of studies has led to the development and refinement of models ... Article
Article  |   September 01, 1998
Neurogenic Language Case Studies: One Approach to the Treatment of Anomia
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Cynthia Ochipa
    James Haley Veterans Administration Hospital, Tampa, FL
  • Lynn M. Maher
    Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA
  • Anastasia M. Raymer
    Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA
Article Information
Neurogenic Language Case Studies
Article   |   September 01, 1998
Neurogenic Language Case Studies: One Approach to the Treatment of Anomia
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, September 1998, Vol. 8, 18-23. doi:10.1044/nnsld8.3.18
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, September 1998, Vol. 8, 18-23. doi:10.1044/nnsld8.3.18
The cognitive neuropsychological approach to the study of language processing combines the investigation of normal performance with investigations of how brain damage may impair an individual’s ability to perform certain language tasks. Converging evidence from these two types of studies has led to the development and refinement of models of the language processing system (Ellis & Young, 1988; Rothi, Raymer, Maher, Greenwald, & Morris, 1991). These models provide a description of the processes involved in the recognition, comprehension, and production of spoken and written words and may help us to understand how subcomponents of the language system may be disturbed following brain damage. Recent efforts in aphasia rehabilitation have emphasized the use of cognitive neuropsychological models to identify an individual’s particular level of linguistic breakdown, and to develop treatment approaches that are compatible with particular loci of impairment (Hillis, 1993; Raymer, Rothi, & Greenwald, 1995).
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