Neurogenic Language Case Studies: Introduction As Helm-Estabrooks and Holland (1998)  noted, there is a rich history in the literature of clinicians and researchers using case studies to describe and advance treatment approaches for neurogenic communication disorders. Accordingly, three case studies are presented in this newsletter which represent not only the variety of neurogenic disorders that ... Article
Article  |   September 01, 1998
Neurogenic Language Case Studies: Introduction
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Laura Murray
    Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, Indiana University-Bloomington
    Issue Editor
Article Information
Neurogenic Language Case Studies
Article   |   September 01, 1998
Neurogenic Language Case Studies: Introduction
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, September 1998, Vol. 8, 11. doi:10.1044/nnsld8.3.11
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, September 1998, Vol. 8, 11. doi:10.1044/nnsld8.3.11
As Helm-Estabrooks and Holland (1998)  noted, there is a rich history in the literature of clinicians and researchers using case studies to describe and advance treatment approaches for neurogenic communication disorders. Accordingly, three case studies are presented in this newsletter which represent not only the variety of neurogenic disorders that clinicians may encounter in daily practice, but also the diversity in treatment approaches that clinicians may adopt to enhance their patients’ communication skills.
For clinicians working with children, Suzanne Hungerford and colleagues contribute a case report on language intervention for Landau-Kleffner syndrome (LKS), a disorder which has received little attention in the treatment literature. They compare the effects of their computer-based language treatment to those of a traditional, play-based language treatment on the expressive language skills of a child with LKS. For clinicians working with adults, Cynthia Ochipa and colleagues present a cognitive neuropsychological approach for the treatment of anomia. Using a single-subject design, they test the ability of their treatment approach to improve the spoken and written naming skills of their traumatically brain-injured client. In contrast, Larry Boles describes his pragmatically-based treatment approach— called “Conducting Conversation”— in which the treatment goal is improved conversational interactions between a patient with aphasia and his/her spouse. Boles documents the positive effects associated with teaching the spouse how to adapt his/her communication skills during conversations with a spouse who has aphasia.
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