Deep Brain Stimulation: Description and Implications for Motor Speech Purpose: Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is a surgical option which has been demonstrated to be effective for treatment of many symptoms in several movement disorders. The purpose of this paper is to describe this surgical option and to discuss its effects on motor speech. Method: The literature is reviewed to ... Article
Article  |   June 01, 2010
Deep Brain Stimulation: Description and Implications for Motor Speech
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Tepanta R. D. Fossett
    Division of Speech Pathology, Department of Neurology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Dysarthria / Voice Disorders / Special Populations / Older Adults & Aging / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Articles
Article   |   June 01, 2010
Deep Brain Stimulation: Description and Implications for Motor Speech
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, June 2010, Vol. 20, 50-54. doi:10.1044/nnsld20.2.50
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, June 2010, Vol. 20, 50-54. doi:10.1044/nnsld20.2.50
Abstract

Purpose: Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is a surgical option which has been demonstrated to be effective for treatment of many symptoms in several movement disorders. The purpose of this paper is to describe this surgical option and to discuss its effects on motor speech.

Method: The literature is reviewed to provide a summary of the information available to describe DBS surgery and its effects on motor speech in neurological disorders. Primary focus is placed on DBS as a treatment for Parkinson's disease (PD) and Essential Tremor (ET).

Results and Conclusions: DBS surgery is a relatively low-risk, common, and reversible surgery used to treat the motor symptoms in many movement disorders, especially PD and ET. It is not currently used as a treatment for any motor speech disorder. Dysarthria is a commonly reported side-effect of bilateral more than unilateral DBS surgery. The reported frequency of motor speech difficulties varies, and few studies have specifically examined motor speech with reliable and objective measures. However, though frequently present, negative effects of DBS on motor speech appear to be mild in severity.

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