Speech and Cognitive-Linguistic Function in Parkinson's Disease Purpose: Parkinson's disease is among the most common of the motor-based progressive neurologic disorders. This article provides a review of the motor, cognitive, sensory-perceptual, and linguistic deficits that may occur as a result of the loss of dopaminergic neurons, which causes Parkinson's disease. Method: A review of the literature regarding ... Article
Article  |   June 2010
Speech and Cognitive-Linguistic Function in Parkinson's Disease
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Kristie Spencer
    Department of Speech and Hearing Services, University of Washington, Seattle
  • Janelle Sanchez
    Department of Speech and Hearing Services, University of Washington, Seattle
  • Audra McAllen
    Department of Speech and Hearing Services, University of Washington, Seattle
  • Phillip Weir
    Department of Speech and Hearing Services, University of Washington, Seattle
  • © 2010 American Speech-Language-Hearing Association
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Dysarthria / Special Populations / Older Adults & Aging / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Articles
Article   |   June 2010
Speech and Cognitive-Linguistic Function in Parkinson's Disease
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, June 2010, Vol. 20, 31-38. doi:10.1044/nnsld20.2.31
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, June 2010, Vol. 20, 31-38. doi:10.1044/nnsld20.2.31
Abstract

Purpose: Parkinson's disease is among the most common of the motor-based progressive neurologic disorders. This article provides a review of the motor, cognitive, sensory-perceptual, and linguistic deficits that may occur as a result of the loss of dopaminergic neurons, which causes Parkinson's disease.

Method: A review of the literature regarding the nature of Parkinson's disease points out the primary triad of symptoms, which are tremor, rigidity, and bradykinesia. Descriptions of these cardinal symptoms are discussed, as are the non-motor symptoms frequently seen in this disorder, including cognitive changes, sensory-perceptual deficits, and occasionally, linguistic deficits. Dysarthria and dysphagia are frequently seen as a result of the motor deficits associated with Parkinson's disease.

Conclusions: Much has been learned about the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease, which has led to improved pharmacologic, surgical, and behavioral management. Speech-language pathologists (SLPs) need to be aware of these advances in order to better assess and treat patients and educate families.

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