Studies of Articulatory Feedback Treatment for Apraxia of Speech Based on Electromagnetic Articulography Electromagnetic articulography (EMA) is a method originally designed for the laboratory measurement of speech articulatory motion (Schönle et al., 1987). We describe a novel use of this technology applied to the remediation of apraxia of speech (AOS). In this experimental technique, individuals with AOS are provided with real-time, visual information ... Article
Article  |   October 01, 2010
Studies of Articulatory Feedback Treatment for Apraxia of Speech Based on Electromagnetic Articulography
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • William F. Katz
    Department of Communication Disorders, University of Texas, Dallas, TX
  • Malcolm R. McNeil
    Department of Communication Disorders, University of Pittsburgh
    Pittsburgh Veterans Administration Healthcare System, Pittsburgh, PA
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Apraxia of Speech & Childhood Apraxia of Speech / Articles
Article   |   October 01, 2010
Studies of Articulatory Feedback Treatment for Apraxia of Speech Based on Electromagnetic Articulography
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, October 2010, Vol. 20, 73-79. doi:10.1044/nnsld20.3.73
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, October 2010, Vol. 20, 73-79. doi:10.1044/nnsld20.3.73

Electromagnetic articulography (EMA) is a method originally designed for the laboratory measurement of speech articulatory motion (Schönle et al., 1987). We describe a novel use of this technology applied to the remediation of apraxia of speech (AOS). In this experimental technique, individuals with AOS are provided with real-time, visual information concerning the movement of the tongue during speech. From information sent via EMA sensors mounted on the tongue, patients are guided into hitting “targets” displayed on a computer monitor, designed to guide correct articulatory placement. The results of several studies suggest that augmented feedback-based treatment is efficacious and that this treatment follows principles of motor learning described in the limb motor literature. Potential challenges facing this type of approach, as well as some new directions, are discussed.

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