CE Introduction Acquired apraxia of speech (AOS) typically results from a left middle cerebral artery stroke damaging the left inferior-posterior frontal lobe. Reliable diagnosis and effective treatment of AOS has been complicated by the frequent co-occurrence of aphasia in these individuals. Over the past decade, a number of new approaches to ... SIG News
SIG News  |   October 01, 2010
CE Introduction
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Kirrie J. Ballard
    Discipline of Speech Pathology, University of SydneySydney, Australia
    Guest Editor
Article Information
SIG News
SIG News   |   October 01, 2010
CE Introduction
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, October 2010, Vol. 20, 58. doi:10.1044/nnsld20.3.58
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, October 2010, Vol. 20, 58. doi:10.1044/nnsld20.3.58
Acquired apraxia of speech (AOS) typically results from a left middle cerebral artery stroke damaging the left inferior-posterior frontal lobe. Reliable diagnosis and effective treatment of AOS has been complicated by the frequent co-occurrence of aphasia in these individuals. Over the past decade, a number of new approaches to AOS treatment have emerged and show promise for long-term improvements in speech production and communication. This issue of Perspectives presents six reports detailing a range of treatment approaches to guide practice, their theoretical motivation, and supportive evidence to date.
The first five papers focus on treatments directly addressing speech motor control, while the sixth paper examines the interplay of speech and gesture. First, Wolfram Ziegler, Ingrid Aichert, and Anja Staiger summarize a series of experiments that support working at the level of the syllable, rather than individual speech sounds, and show that fluency and segmental accuracy are improved through use of a rhythmic cueing technique. Second, Julie Wambaugh reviews her programmatic research into Sound Production Treatment, which focuses on improving articulatory movements during speech. Third, William Katz and Malcolm McNeil explore the benefits of visual biofeedback to guide accurate tongue movement during speech, using electromagnetic articulography as an example biofeedback device. Fourth, Edwin Maas reviews the growing body of evidence to support the use of principles of motor learning in treatment for AOS, specifically how to structure the practice session and the type and frequency of feedback to provide the most benefit to patients. Fifth, Kirrie Ballard, Rosemary Varley, and Diane Kendall present on some approaches that are in earlier stages of trialing and show promise for the future. Sixth, Anastasia Raymer, Beth McHose, and Kimberly Graham detail a gestural facilitation intervention and discuss the interaction of anomia and AOS in treatment responsivity.
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