Patient-Reported Outcome Measures in Aphasia Patient-reported outcomes (PROs) for persons with aphasia offer a new method of obtaining subjective reports of social and psychological wellbeing subsequent to stroke and/or aphasia. Several instruments designed to elicit self-report in stroke patients, including those who have aphasia, have adopted aphasia-friendly formats and have included persons with all levels ... Article
Article  |   December 01, 2012
Patient-Reported Outcome Measures in Aphasia
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Billy Irwin
    VA Tennessee Valley Healthcare System, Nashville, TN
  • Disclosure: Billy Irwin has no financial or nonfinancial relationships related to the content of this article.
    Disclosure: Billy Irwin has no financial or nonfinancial relationships related to the content of this article.×
  • Author
    Author×
    Billy Irwin is Assistant Chief of Audiology and Speech Pathology at the VA Tennessee Valley Healthcare System. His research interests include use of technology in aphasia treatment, and he teaches courses in aphasia, cognitive communicative disorders, and voice disorders.
    Billy Irwin is Assistant Chief of Audiology and Speech Pathology at the VA Tennessee Valley Healthcare System. His research interests include use of technology in aphasia treatment, and he teaches courses in aphasia, cognitive communicative disorders, and voice disorders.×
Article Information
Language Disorders / Aphasia / Articles
Article   |   December 01, 2012
Patient-Reported Outcome Measures in Aphasia
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, December 2012, Vol. 22, 160-166. doi:10.1044/nnsld22.4.160
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, December 2012, Vol. 22, 160-166. doi:10.1044/nnsld22.4.160

Patient-reported outcomes (PROs) for persons with aphasia offer a new method of obtaining subjective reports of social and psychological wellbeing subsequent to stroke and/or aphasia. Several instruments designed to elicit self-report in stroke patients, including those who have aphasia, have adopted aphasia-friendly formats and have included persons with all levels of severity in the development of the instrument. A brief overview of currently available tools is provided with comments regarding the primary focus of the tools and some of the reported psychometric properties. In addition, this article includes a discussion of the rationale and forces that are driving the development and use of these tools, including systematic health-care changes and an increased prominence of the social approach to aphasia. Also, the author discusses an overview of the current and future application of PROs.

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