PROMPT Treatment Method and Apraxia of Speech Acquired apraxia of speech (AOS) is a neurogenic speech disorder that is characterized by speech sound errors, slowed rate of speech production, and disrupted prosody (Square, Martin, & Bose, 2001). The speech difficulties observed with AOS are considered to arise from disturbances in the specification of the temporal and ... Article
Article  |   December 01, 2001
PROMPT Treatment Method and Apraxia of Speech
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Arpita Bose
    University of TorontoToronto, Canada
  • Paula A. Square
    University of TorontoToronto, Canada
Article Information
Articles
Article   |   December 01, 2001
PROMPT Treatment Method and Apraxia of Speech
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, December 2001, Vol. 11, 5-8. doi:10.1044/nnsld11.4.5
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, December 2001, Vol. 11, 5-8. doi:10.1044/nnsld11.4.5
Acquired apraxia of speech (AOS) is a neurogenic speech disorder that is characterized by speech sound errors, slowed rate of speech production, and disrupted prosody (Square, Martin, & Bose, 2001). The speech difficulties observed with AOS are considered to arise from disturbances in the specification of the temporal and spatial aspects of speech sound production (McNeil, Doyle, & Wambaugh, 2000). That is, AOS is thought to reflect a disrupted speech motor system.
Facilitation of the speech motor system of individuals with apraxia of speech (AOS) can be provided in a variety of ways, including tactile and kinesthetic support (see Square, Martin, & Bose, 2001) or melodic and rhythmic methods (Sparks & Deck, 1986; Square, Roy, & Martin, 1997). Prompts for Restructuring Oral Muscular Phonetic Targets (PROMPT) is a tactile-kinesthetic-based treatment method that employs components of both articulatory/kinematic and rhythmic/rate control strategies in the treatment of AOS. This method was originally developed by Chumpelik (1984)  for the treatment of children with developmental motor speech disorders and has subsequently been modified and effectively employed with adults with motor speech disorders (Square-Storer & Hay den, 1989). The oral-facial cues/prompts are targeted to guide the client through the temporal and spatial aspects of speech movements using a combination of proprioceptive, pressure, and kinesthetic cues. These cues are designed to heighten sensory input regarding the place of articulatory contact, extent of mandibular opening, presence and extent of labial rounding and retraction, voicing, muscle tension, timing of segments, manner of articulation, and/or coarticulation. As a method, PROMPT helps the client to gain voluntary control of the motor speech system and links the necessary motor movements that help create holistic motor-phoneme maps to linguistic equivalents for use in communication (Hayden, 1999). That is, PROMPT is considered to facilitate the translation of articulatory-kinematic parameters of speech production to the corresponding phonemes and, further, to the resultant words and phrases intended for production.
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