CEU Introduction: Empirical Support for Treatment of Acquired Apraxia of Speech This issue of the Division 2 Newsletter is devoted to the discussion and review of evidence supporting the use of various treatments for acquired apraxia of speech (AOS). The field of AOS treatment research is relatively new, in that the first published reports of treatments for AOS appeared in the ... SIG News
SIG News  |   December 01, 2001
CEU Introduction: Empirical Support for Treatment of Acquired Apraxia of Speech
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SIG News
SIG News   |   December 01, 2001
CEU Introduction: Empirical Support for Treatment of Acquired Apraxia of Speech
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, December 2001, Vol. 11, 4. doi:10.1044/nnsld11.4.4
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, December 2001, Vol. 11, 4. doi:10.1044/nnsld11.4.4
This issue of the Division 2 Newsletter is devoted to the discussion and review of evidence supporting the use of various treatments for acquired apraxia of speech (AOS). The field of AOS treatment research is relatively new, in that the first published reports of treatments for AOS appeared in the early to mid-1970s (Keith & Aronson, 1975; Rosenbek, Lemme, Ahern, Harris, & Wertz, 1973). Since that time, a variety of treatment methods have been discussed (see McNeil, Doyle, & Wambaugh, 2000, for a review). Investigators have been slowly, but consistently, making progress in the evaluation and refinement of AOS treatments. Researchers have moved from reporting uncontrolled case studies to employing experimental methods to assess treatment effects. In considering Robey’s (2001)  discussion of the typical stages involved in the development of evidence-based treatments, the field of AOS treatment research could be described as being in the early stages of evaluating “efficacy”
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