The Power of One: Clinical Practice in Neurogenics: A Model: Advocating for Children With Neurologic Communication Disorders The need for specific advocacy efforts focused on issues affecting children with neurologic communication disorders was brought to the attention of the Division 2 Advocacy Committee by one of its newest members, Joan Arvedson. Joan’s advocacy efforts for children are exemplified by the depth and breadth of her involvement in ... Article
Article  |   December 01, 2001
The Power of One: Clinical Practice in Neurogenics: A Model: Advocating for Children With Neurologic Communication Disorders
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The Power of One: Clinical Practice in Neurogenics
Article   |   December 01, 2001
The Power of One: Clinical Practice in Neurogenics: A Model: Advocating for Children With Neurologic Communication Disorders
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, December 2001, Vol. 11, 31-32. doi:10.1044/nnsld11.4.31
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, December 2001, Vol. 11, 31-32. doi:10.1044/nnsld11.4.31
The need for specific advocacy efforts focused on issues affecting children with neurologic communication disorders was brought to the attention of the Division 2 Advocacy Committee by one of its newest members, Joan Arvedson. Joan’s advocacy efforts for children are exemplified by the depth and breadth of her involvement in a variety of activities. She is a model of what the Power of One means and how effective it can be.
At the request of the Division 2 Advocacy Committee as part of its 2-year Committee Work Plan targeting the needs of children with neurogenic communication disorders, I was appointed to the ASHA Ad Hoc Committee on Speech-Language Pathology Practice in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU). This committee is developing appropriate policy documents to explain, support, and guide ASHA members and other interested parties regarding speech-language pathology services to neo-nates, their families, and other caregivers. Division 2 affiliates who have specific concerns or recommendations about aspects to be included in documents that will lead to practice guidelines should contact me at Children’s Hospital of Buffalo/Kaleida Health, Buffalo, NY, 14209, or, after January 2, 2002, at Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI. The committee held a one-day meeting in conjunction with ASHA in November 2001 and is planning a 3-day meeting early in 2002, and “home work” for evidenced-based research as a basis for the group to write the necessary documents.
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