Treatment Research on Augmentative and Alternative Communication for Adults With Apraxia of Speech The typical constellation of symptoms among individuals with apraxia of speech (AOS) makes them excellent candidates for augmentative and alternative communication (AAC). When present in relative isolation, AOS is a modality-specific disorder disrupting speech motor programming, sparing communication through other language modalities. Even when AOS is concomitant with aphasia, as ... Article
Article  |   December 01, 2001
Treatment Research on Augmentative and Alternative Communication for Adults With Apraxia of Speech
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Margaret A. Rogers
    University of Washington, Seattle
Article Information
Articles
Article   |   December 01, 2001
Treatment Research on Augmentative and Alternative Communication for Adults With Apraxia of Speech
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, December 2001, Vol. 11, 21-28. doi:10.1044/nnsld11.4.21
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, December 2001, Vol. 11, 21-28. doi:10.1044/nnsld11.4.21
The typical constellation of symptoms among individuals with apraxia of speech (AOS) makes them excellent candidates for augmentative and alternative communication (AAC). When present in relative isolation, AOS is a modality-specific disorder disrupting speech motor programming, sparing communication through other language modalities. Even when AOS is concomitant with aphasia, as is typically the case, many of the affected individuals have only mild to moderate impairments of auditory comprehension, reading, and writing, thus enabling these modalities to augment spoken communication. Unfortunately, there is a paucity of research in the application of AAC with this population. The neglect of this area is regrettable because most individuals with moderate to severe AOS may have the communication and cognitive competencies to allow them to use AAC to communicate more effectively than with their impaired speech. While there is insufficient evidence to confirm this proposal, the likelihood of its veracity mandates that AAC be considered a central component of clinical practice with this population.
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