Oral Motor Training and Treatment for Apraxia of Speech The relationship between speech abilities and non-speech oral abilities is unclear and has been debated for many years (e.g., Folkins et al., 1995; Weismer, 1997; Weismer & Liss, 1991). Because the same anatomical structures are involved in both speech and non-speech movements, it is not surprising that investigators and clinicians ... Article
Article  |   December 01, 2001
Oral Motor Training and Treatment for Apraxia of Speech
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Linda I. Shuster
    West Virginia University, Morgantown
Article Information
Articles
Article   |   December 01, 2001
Oral Motor Training and Treatment for Apraxia of Speech
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, December 2001, Vol. 11, 18-20. doi:10.1044/nnsld11.4.18
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, December 2001, Vol. 11, 18-20. doi:10.1044/nnsld11.4.18
The relationship between speech abilities and non-speech oral abilities is unclear and has been debated for many years (e.g., Folkins et al., 1995; Weismer, 1997; Weismer & Liss, 1991). Because the same anatomical structures are involved in both speech and non-speech movements, it is not surprising that investigators and clinicians have speculated that there is a relationship between the two. However, studies of normal speakers, as well as individuals with neuromotor speech problems, have yielded inconclusive results.
Describing the nature of the re-lationship between apraxia of speech (AOS) and non-speech oral abilities is particularly controversial, because there is not universal agreement on the underlying basis for AOS. While most investigators and clinicians consider AOS to be a disorder of speech motor control (Brookshire, 1973; Duffy, 1995; McNeil, Robin, & Schmidt, 1997), others, such as Dogil and Mayer (1998)  have proposed that the deficit in AOS is at a linguistic level. If AOS is a linguistic problem, and not a disorder of speech motor control, then treatment of AOS, in theory, should not directly target speech production processes or non-speech oral movements.
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