Traumatic Brain Injury: A Trauma Surgeon's Perspective Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a serious epidemic in the United States. It affects patients of all ages, race, and socioeconomic status (SES). The current care of these patients typically manifests after sequelae have been identified after discharge from the hospital, long after the inciting event. The purpose of this ... Article
Article  |   October 01, 2012
Traumatic Brain Injury: A Trauma Surgeon's Perspective
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Oscar D. Guillamondegui
    Department of Surgery, Division of Trauma, Emergency Surgery and Surgical Critical Care, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN
  • Disclosure: Oscar D. Guillamondegui is a trauma surgeon at Vanderbilt University Medical Center as a part of a multidisciplinary team that is described in this article.
    Disclosure: Oscar D. Guillamondegui is a trauma surgeon at Vanderbilt University Medical Center as a part of a multidisciplinary team that is described in this article.×
  • Author
    Author×
    Oscar D. Guillamondegui is an associate professor of surgery in the Division of Trauma, Emergency Surgery and Surgical Critical care with secondary associate professor appointments in the departments of Neurologic Surgery and Hearing and Speech Sciences. He is currently the trauma medical director for the Level I Vanderbilt Trauma Center and medical director of the trauma intensive care unit. He is also the medical director of the Multidisciplinary Traumatic Brain Injury Clinic at Vanderbilt University Medical Center. His areas of interest and research focus on outcomes related to trauma and emergency surgery with a particular focus on traumatic brain injury and endocrine issues.
    Oscar D. Guillamondegui is an associate professor of surgery in the Division of Trauma, Emergency Surgery and Surgical Critical care with secondary associate professor appointments in the departments of Neurologic Surgery and Hearing and Speech Sciences. He is currently the trauma medical director for the Level I Vanderbilt Trauma Center and medical director of the trauma intensive care unit. He is also the medical director of the Multidisciplinary Traumatic Brain Injury Clinic at Vanderbilt University Medical Center. His areas of interest and research focus on outcomes related to trauma and emergency surgery with a particular focus on traumatic brain injury and endocrine issues.×
Article Information
Healthcare Settings / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Traumatic Brain Injury / Articles
Article   |   October 01, 2012
Traumatic Brain Injury: A Trauma Surgeon's Perspective
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, October 2012, Vol. 22, 82-89. doi:10.1044/nnsld22.3.82
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, October 2012, Vol. 22, 82-89. doi:10.1044/nnsld22.3.82

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a serious epidemic in the United States. It affects patients of all ages, race, and socioeconomic status (SES). The current care of these patients typically manifests after sequelae have been identified after discharge from the hospital, long after the inciting event. The purpose of this article is to introduce the concept of identification and management of the TBI patient from the moment of injury through long-term care as a multidisciplinary approach. By promoting an awareness of the issues that develop around the acutely injured brain and linking them to long-term outcomes, the trauma team can initiate care early to alter the effect on the patient, family, and community. Hopefully, by describing the care afforded at a trauma center and by a multidisciplinary team, we can bring a better understanding to the armamentarium of methods utilized to treat the difficult population of TBI patients.

Acknowledgments
The inspiration to move this project forward could not have been performed without the intellectual prowess and fortitude of Amanda Hereford, Continuing Education Content Manager for ASHA Special Interest Group 2, Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders. Without her guidance and strength, and being one of the many folks to educate me as to the need for the multidisciplinary approach to medicine, it never would have happened. For that, I am deeply indebted. Many thanks.
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