Vocabulary Associated With Medical Procedures The purpose of this project was to identify unique vocabulary associated with specific medical procedures. Personnel from six medical facilities with acute care or long-term acute care hospital (LTACH) units participated by proposing vocabulary/messages associated with procedures in which they routinely participated. Speech-language pathologists, respiratory therapists, physicians, nurses, chaplains, and ... Article
Article  |   October 01, 2012
Vocabulary Associated With Medical Procedures
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • David Beukelman
    University of Nebraska–Lincoln, Lincoln, NE
  • Abbey Schrunk
    University of Nebraska–Lincoln, Lincoln, NE
  • Amber Thiessen
    University of Nebraska–Lincoln, Lincoln, NE
  • Susan Fager
    Institute for Rehabilitation Science and Engineering at Madonna Rehabilitation Hospital, Lincoln, NE
  • Cara Ullman
    University of Nebraska–Lincoln, Lincoln, NE
  • Disclosure: David Beukelman has no financial or nonfinancial relationships related to the content of this article.
    Disclosure: David Beukelman has no financial or nonfinancial relationships related to the content of this article.×
  • Disclosure: Abbey Schrunk has no financial or nonfinancial relationships related to the content of this article.
    Disclosure: Abbey Schrunk has no financial or nonfinancial relationships related to the content of this article.×
  • Disclosure: Amber Thiessen has no financial or nonfinancial relationships related to the content of this article.
    Disclosure: Amber Thiessen has no financial or nonfinancial relationships related to the content of this article.×
  • Disclosure: Susan Fager has no financial or nonfinancial relationships related to the content of this article.
    Disclosure: Susan Fager has no financial or nonfinancial relationships related to the content of this article.×
  • Disclosure: Cara Ullman has no financial or nonfinancial relationships related to the content of this article.
    Disclosure: Cara Ullman has no financial or nonfinancial relationships related to the content of this article.×
  • Authors
    Authors×
    David R. Beukelman is the Barkley Professor of Communication Disorders at the University of Nebraska–Lincoln, a research partner in the Rehabilitation Engineering and Research Center in Augmentative and Alternative Communication, and a senior researcher in the Institute for Rehabilitation Science and Engineering at the Madonna Rehabilitation Hospital. He co-authored the textbook, Augmentative and Alternative Communication: Supporting Children and Adults With Complex Communication Needs, and co-edited the book, Augmentative Communication Strategies for Adults With Acute and Chronic Medical Conditions. He served as editor of the Augmentative and Alternative Communication Journal for four years.
    David R. Beukelman is the Barkley Professor of Communication Disorders at the University of Nebraska–Lincoln, a research partner in the Rehabilitation Engineering and Research Center in Augmentative and Alternative Communication, and a senior researcher in the Institute for Rehabilitation Science and Engineering at the Madonna Rehabilitation Hospital. He co-authored the textbook, Augmentative and Alternative Communication: Supporting Children and Adults With Complex Communication Needs, and co-edited the book, Augmentative Communication Strategies for Adults With Acute and Chronic Medical Conditions. He served as editor of the Augmentative and Alternative Communication Journal for four years.×
    Abbey Schrunk is a graduate student in speech-language pathology at the University of Nebraska–Lincoln.
    Abbey Schrunk is a graduate student in speech-language pathology at the University of Nebraska–Lincoln.×
    Amber Thiessen is a doctoral student at the University of Nebraska–Lincoln, specializing in AAC and acquired neurogenic communication disorders. Prior to her doctoral studies, she was a speech-language pathologist at Quality Living, Inc., in Omaha, NE.
    Amber Thiessen is a doctoral student at the University of Nebraska–Lincoln, specializing in AAC and acquired neurogenic communication disorders. Prior to her doctoral studies, she was a speech-language pathologist at Quality Living, Inc., in Omaha, NE.×
    Susan Koch Fager is director of the Communication Center in the Research Institute of Rehabilitation Science and Engineering, the coordinator of the Assistive Technology Program, and a speech-language pathologist at Madonna Rehabilitation Hospital, Lincoln, NE. Fager specializes in AAC and motor speech disorders.
    Susan Koch Fager is director of the Communication Center in the Research Institute of Rehabilitation Science and Engineering, the coordinator of the Assistive Technology Program, and a speech-language pathologist at Madonna Rehabilitation Hospital, Lincoln, NE. Fager specializes in AAC and motor speech disorders.×
    Cara Ullman is the AAC research laboratory coordinator in the Communication Disorders Division at the University of Nebraska–Lincoln. She has a master's degree in instructional technology with an emphasis on communication disorders.
    Cara Ullman is the AAC research laboratory coordinator in the Communication Disorders Division at the University of Nebraska–Lincoln. She has a master's degree in instructional technology with an emphasis on communication disorders.×
Article Information
Augmentative & Alternative Communication / Articles
Article   |   October 01, 2012
Vocabulary Associated With Medical Procedures
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, October 2012, Vol. 22, 119-123. doi:10.1044/nnsld22.3.119
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, October 2012, Vol. 22, 119-123. doi:10.1044/nnsld22.3.119

The purpose of this project was to identify unique vocabulary associated with specific medical procedures. Personnel from six medical facilities with acute care or long-term acute care hospital (LTACH) units participated by proposing vocabulary/messages associated with procedures in which they routinely participated. Speech-language pathologists, respiratory therapists, physicians, nurses, chaplains, and nursing aids participated in the project. The unique vocabulary associated with common medical procedures is available in this article and on our augmentative and alternative communication–related website, http://aac.unl.edu.

Acknowledgment
The authors wish to thank the site coordinators from each of the collaborating hospitals: Cindy Synder (St. Elizabeth Regional Medical Center), Cheryl Wagner (Madonna Rehabilitation Hospital), Carol Gaebler (University of Nebraska Medical Center), Julie McDaniel (BryanLGH Health System), Erica Schott (Columbus Community Hospital), and Becky Seger (West Holt Medical Services). The Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center on Communication Enhancement (AAC-RERC) is funded under grant #H133E080011 from the National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research (NIDRR) in the U.S. Department of Education's Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services (OSERS).
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