Project BRAIN: Working Together to Improve Educational Outcomes for Students With Traumatic Brain Injury Children and youth who sustain traumatic brain injury (TBI) are at risk for being unidentified or misidentified and, even if appropriately identified, are at risk of encountering professionals who are ill-equipped to address their unique needs. A comparison of the number of people in Tennessee ages 3–21 years incurring brain ... Article
Article  |   October 01, 2012
Project BRAIN: Working Together to Improve Educational Outcomes for Students With Traumatic Brain Injury
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Paula Denslow
    Project BRAIN, Tennessee Disability Coalition, Nashville, TN
  • Jean Doster
    Tennessee Department of Health, Traumatic Brain Injury Program, Nashville, TN
  • Kristin King
    Department of Audiology and Speech Pathology, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Knoxville, TN
  • Jennifer Rayman
    Project BRAIN, Tennessee Disability Coalition, Knoxville, TN
  • Disclosure: Paula Denslow is director of Project BRAIN, described in this article.
    Disclosure: Paula Denslow is director of Project BRAIN, described in this article.×
  • Disclosure: Jean Doster is program director of the Tennessee Department of Health, Traumatic Brain Injury Program, which provides support for Project BRAIN, described in this article.
    Disclosure: Jean Doster is program director of the Tennessee Department of Health, Traumatic Brain Injury Program, which provides support for Project BRAIN, described in this article.×
  • Disclosure: Kristin King has no financial or nonfinancial relationships related to the content of this article.
    Disclosure: Kristin King has no financial or nonfinancial relationships related to the content of this article.×
  • Disclosure: Jennifer Rayman is a curriculum coordinator/trainer of Project BRAIN, described in this article. She also serves as a volunteer on the Sertoma Center's Human Rights Committee (2008–current).
    Disclosure: Jennifer Rayman is a curriculum coordinator/trainer of Project BRAIN, described in this article. She also serves as a volunteer on the Sertoma Center's Human Rights Committee (2008–current).×
  • Authors
    Authors×
    Paula Denslow is the director of Project BRAIN, a program funded by HRSA grants with support from the Tennessee DOE.
    Paula Denslow is the director of Project BRAIN, a program funded by HRSA grants with support from the Tennessee DOE.×
    Jean Doster is the program director of the Tennessee Department of Health, Traumatic Brain Injury Program.
    Jean Doster is the program director of the Tennessee Department of Health, Traumatic Brain Injury Program.×
    Kristin King is an assistant professor in the Department of Audiology and Speech Pathology at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Knoxville, TN. Her primary research interest involves the investigation of hemispheric processing and neurocognitive skills for linguistic processes in individuals following TBI.
    Kristin King is an assistant professor in the Department of Audiology and Speech Pathology at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Knoxville, TN. Her primary research interest involves the investigation of hemispheric processing and neurocognitive skills for linguistic processes in individuals following TBI.×
    Jennifer Rayman is a curriculum coordinator/trainer for Project BRAIN and the Tennessee Disability Coalition in Knoxville, TN.
    Jennifer Rayman is a curriculum coordinator/trainer for Project BRAIN and the Tennessee Disability Coalition in Knoxville, TN.×
Article Information
School-Based Settings / Healthcare Settings / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Traumatic Brain Injury / Articles
Article   |   October 01, 2012
Project BRAIN: Working Together to Improve Educational Outcomes for Students With Traumatic Brain Injury
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, October 2012, Vol. 22, 106-118. doi:10.1044/nnsld22.3.106
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, October 2012, Vol. 22, 106-118. doi:10.1044/nnsld22.3.106

Children and youth who sustain traumatic brain injury (TBI) are at risk for being unidentified or misidentified and, even if appropriately identified, are at risk of encountering professionals who are ill-equipped to address their unique needs. A comparison of the number of people in Tennessee ages 3–21 years incurring brain injury compared to the number of students ages 3–21 years being categorized and served as TBI by the Department of Education (DOE) motivated us to create this program. Identified needs addressed by the program include the following: (a) accurate identification of students with TBI; (b) training of school personnel; (c) development of linkages and training of hospital personnel; and (d) hospital-school transition intervention. Funded by Health Services and Resources Administration (HRSA) grants with support from the Tennessee DOE, Project BRAIN focuses on improving educational outcomes for students with TBI through the provision of specialized group training and ongoing education for educators, families, and health professionals who support students with TBI. The program seeks to link families, hospitals, and community health providers with school professionals such as speech-language pathologists (SLPs) to identify and address the needs of students with brain injury.

Acknowledgments
Project BRAIN is supported in part by project H21MCO6739 from the Department of Health & Human Services, Health Resources and Services Administration, Maternal and Child Health Bureau. Additional support is provided by the Tennessee Department of Education, Division of Special Education, and the Tennessee Department of Health, Traumatic Brain Injury Program.
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