E-Reading Technology: Considerations for Readers With Neurological Impairments E-reading technology provides both new options and challenges to readers with neurological impairments. In this article, the authors define e-reading technology and consider how advances in technology have led to increased reading demands which individuals must face in order to participate in a range of functional activities. The authors then ... Article
Article  |   August 2012
E-Reading Technology: Considerations for Readers With Neurological Impairments
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Gina G. Griffiths
    University of Oregon, Eugene, OR
  • Gina Biancarosa
    University of Oregon, Eugene, OR
  • Gina G. Griffiths

    Disclosure: Gina G. Griffiths has no financial or nonfinancial relationships related to the content of this article.

  • Disclosure: Gina Biancarosa has no financial or nonfinancial relationships related to the content of this article.
    Disclosure: Gina Biancarosa has no financial or nonfinancial relationships related to the content of this article.×
  • Gina G. Griffiths is a doctoral candidate in communications disorders and sciences (CDS) at the University of Oregon. She coordinates a project called CampusReader, an NSF-funded project dedicated to designing and evaluating electronically delivered reading strategies for post-secondary students with cognitive impairments. She completed her master’s in CDS in 1997 from Boston University.
    Gina G. Griffiths is a doctoral candidate in communications disorders and sciences (CDS) at the University of Oregon. She coordinates a project called CampusReader, an NSF-funded project dedicated to designing and evaluating electronically delivered reading strategies for post-secondary students with cognitive impairments. She completed her master’s in CDS in 1997 from Boston University.×
  • Gina Biancarosa is an assistant professor in the Department of Educational Methodology, Policy, and Leadership. She has served as Carnegie Council on Advancing Adolescent Literacy and has coauthored several policy reports, articles, and books on adolescent literacy, including Reading Next: A Vision for Action and Research in Middle and High School Literacy.
    Gina Biancarosa is an assistant professor in the Department of Educational Methodology, Policy, and Leadership. She has served as Carnegie Council on Advancing Adolescent Literacy and has coauthored several policy reports, articles, and books on adolescent literacy, including Reading Next: A Vision for Action and Research in Middle and High School Literacy.×
  • © 2012 American Speech-Language-Hearing AssociationAmerican Speech-Language-Hearing Association
Article Information
Research Issues, Methods & Evidence-Based Practice / Normal Language Processing / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions
Article   |   August 2012
E-Reading Technology: Considerations for Readers With Neurological Impairments
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, August 2012, Vol. 22, 56-66. doi:10.1044/nnsld22.2.56
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, August 2012, Vol. 22, 56-66. doi:10.1044/nnsld22.2.56

E-reading technology provides both new options and challenges to readers with neurological impairments. In this article, the authors define e-reading technology and consider how advances in technology have led to increased reading demands which individuals must face in order to participate in a range of functional activities. The authors then review literature that identifies some of the challenges technology brings to the actual reading process and what skills researchers suggest readers need in order to navigate these challenges. Finally, the authors highlight some of the ways e-reading technology, as a tool, can support individuals who struggle with activities that require reading. To do this, they consider empirical findings from educational research, given the lack of published articles specific to e-reading technology supports for individuals with neurological diagnoses.

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