Use of Life Interests and Values (LIV) Cards for Self-Determination of Aphasia Rehabilitation Goals The concepts of self-determination and autonomy are now recognized as powerful factors in the ways people respond to rehabilitation. In this paper, we define these concepts and demonstrate that when self-determination and autonomy are incorporated into treatment delivery approaches, patient compliance, outcomes, and satisfaction improve. Determining the rehabilitation goals of ... Article
Article  |   April 2012
Use of Life Interests and Values (LIV) Cards for Self-Determination of Aphasia Rehabilitation Goals
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Nancy Helm-Estabrooks
    Western Carolina University, Cullowee, NC
    University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC
  • Janet Whiteside
    University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL
  • Nancy Helm-Estabrooks, ScD, CCC-SLP, BC-ANCDS, is a Professor Emeritus in the Department of Communication Disorders and Sciences at Western Carolina University. She also holds the position of adjunct research professor at the University of North Carolina–Chapel Hill. Her scholarly work focuses on aphasia and cognitive-communicative disorders. She has published more than 100 peer-reviewed papers and authored/co-authored 7 books, 21 chapters, and 6 standardized tests. Dr. Helm-Estabrooks is an ASHA Fellow and a recipient of ASHA Honors.
    Nancy Helm-Estabrooks, ScD, CCC-SLP, BC-ANCDS, is a Professor Emeritus in the Department of Communication Disorders and Sciences at Western Carolina University. She also holds the position of adjunct research professor at the University of North Carolina–Chapel Hill. Her scholarly work focuses on aphasia and cognitive-communicative disorders. She has published more than 100 peer-reviewed papers and authored/co-authored 7 books, 21 chapters, and 6 standardized tests. Dr. Helm-Estabrooks is an ASHA Fellow and a recipient of ASHA Honors.×
  • Janet D. Whiteside, PhD, CCC-SLP, is Chair of the Board of Clinical Educators at the University of Central Florida’s Communication Disorders Clinic. She is the founder of The Aphasia House, an innovative, intensive therapy program for people with aphasia. Her applied research is transdisciplinary and includes study and treatment of behavioral sequelae of stroke, traumatic brain injury, and dementia.
    Janet D. Whiteside, PhD, CCC-SLP, is Chair of the Board of Clinical Educators at the University of Central Florida’s Communication Disorders Clinic. She is the founder of The Aphasia House, an innovative, intensive therapy program for people with aphasia. Her applied research is transdisciplinary and includes study and treatment of behavioral sequelae of stroke, traumatic brain injury, and dementia.×
  • © 2012 American Speech-Language-Hearing Association
Article Information
Language Disorders / Aphasia
Article   |   April 2012
Use of Life Interests and Values (LIV) Cards for Self-Determination of Aphasia Rehabilitation Goals
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, April 2012, Vol. 22, 6-11. doi:10.1044/nnsld22.1.6
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, April 2012, Vol. 22, 6-11. doi:10.1044/nnsld22.1.6

The concepts of self-determination and autonomy are now recognized as powerful factors in the ways people respond to rehabilitation. In this paper, we define these concepts and demonstrate that when self-determination and autonomy are incorporated into treatment delivery approaches, patient compliance, outcomes, and satisfaction improve. Determining the rehabilitation goals of people with aphasia (PWA) is typically challenging, because their communication problems often interfere with valid responding to interviews and questionnaires. The Life Interest and Values (LIV) cards described in this paper were developed as a way to circumvent the linguistic problems of PWA and allow them to choose goals for rehabilitation. We also describe the use of the LIV cards in an intensive aphasia rehabilitation program, how the activities chosen by participants were established as reimbursable goals with measureable outcomes, and case studies illustrating this process.

Acknowledgment
The authors thank Ellen McCracken, MS, CCC-SLP, for her helpful suggestions and careful copyediting of this paper.
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