CE Introduction: Self-Determination in Aphasia Rehabilitation This issue of Perspectives is about self-determination in aphasia rehabilitation. Self-Determination Theory (SDT; Deci & Ryan, 1985; Ryan & Deci, 2000) is a framework for explaining how social and cultural factors can either facilitate or undermine people's motivation, well-being, and performance. According to SDT, the highest quality of motivation ... SIG News
SIG News  |   April 2012
CE Introduction: Self-Determination in Aphasia Rehabilitation
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Katarina L. Haley
    Division of Speech and Hearing Sciences, Department of Allied Health Sciences at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC
  • © 2012 American Speech-Language-Hearing Association
Article Information
SIG News
SIG News   |   April 2012
CE Introduction: Self-Determination in Aphasia Rehabilitation
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, April 2012, Vol. 22, 4-5. doi:10.1044/nnsld22.1.4
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, April 2012, Vol. 22, 4-5. doi:10.1044/nnsld22.1.4
This issue of Perspectives is about self-determination in aphasia rehabilitation. Self-Determination Theory (SDT; Deci & Ryan, 1985; Ryan & Deci, 2000) is a framework for explaining how social and cultural factors can either facilitate or undermine people's motivation, well-being, and performance. According to SDT, the highest quality of motivation and engagement is reached when three psychological needs are met: autonomy, competence, and relatedness. When people engage in activities that are fully aligned with their priorities, when they find they can complete challenging tasks successfully, and when they experience social connection, their performance and persistence increases. The SDT framework has obvious implications for rehabilitation and adjusting to life with aphasia. The rationale is discussed in the five articles in this issue, along with a variety of useful strategies for supporting self-determination in people with aphasia (PWA).
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