The Importance of Aphasia Community Programs in Supporting Self-Determination in PWA Aphasia support groups and aphasia community centers have been increasing in number over the past 2 decades in the United States and abroad. Participation in these innovative community programs can support the process of self-determination in people with aphasia. In this article, I discuss specific examples of how this occurs ... Article
Article  |   April 2012
The Importance of Aphasia Community Programs in Supporting Self-Determination in PWA
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Marjorie Nicholas
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, MGH Institute of Health Professions, Boston, MA
  • Marjorie Nicholas is the associate chair of the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders at the MGH Institute of Health Professions in Boston, MA. She also helps coordinate the Institute's Aphasia Center program, which operates as a training site for advanced practice graduate students.
    Marjorie Nicholas is the associate chair of the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders at the MGH Institute of Health Professions in Boston, MA. She also helps coordinate the Institute's Aphasia Center program, which operates as a training site for advanced practice graduate students.×
  • © 2012 American Speech-Language-Hearing Association
Article Information
Language Disorders / Aphasia / Articles
Article   |   April 2012
The Importance of Aphasia Community Programs in Supporting Self-Determination in PWA
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, April 2012, Vol. 22, 36-43. doi:10.1044/nnsld22.1.36
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, April 2012, Vol. 22, 36-43. doi:10.1044/nnsld22.1.36

Aphasia support groups and aphasia community centers have been increasing in number over the past 2 decades in the United States and abroad. Participation in these innovative community programs can support the process of self-determination in people with aphasia. In this article, I discuss specific examples of how this occurs and, in addition, review the Living With Aphasia: Framework for Outcome Measurement (A-FROM) model (Kagan et al., 2008) as a useful way to conceptualize the individual benefits that people with aphasia (PWA) may receive from participation in aphasia community centers. The article concludes with a case presentation exemplifying the multi-level benefits achieved from participating in aphasia community programs.

Become a SIG Affiliate
Pay Per View
Entire SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders content & archive
24-hour access
This Issue
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access