The Relationship Between Client-Centered Goal-Setting and Treatment Outcomes Shifting definitions of health and well-being, prompted by the World Health Organization's International Classification of Functioning (2001), have stimulated changes in traditional clinician-client relationships in rehabilitation. Among these changes, in keeping with the concept of client-centered care, is a trend toward more collaborative goal-setting and joint determination of intervention plans. ... Article
Article  |   April 2012
The Relationship Between Client-Centered Goal-Setting and Treatment Outcomes
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jennifer L. Womack
    Division of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy, Department of Allied Health Sciences at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC
  • Jennifer L. Womack, MA MS OTR/L, is Clinical Associate Professor, Division of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy, Department of Allied Health Sciences at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC. Her clinical and research interests focus on community-based and client-centered practice, community mobility, and neurorehabilitation.
    Jennifer L. Womack, MA MS OTR/L, is Clinical Associate Professor, Division of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy, Department of Allied Health Sciences at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC. Her clinical and research interests focus on community-based and client-centered practice, community mobility, and neurorehabilitation.×
  • © 2012 American Speech-Language-Hearing Association
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Special Populations / International & Global / Language Disorders / Aphasia / Articles
Article   |   April 2012
The Relationship Between Client-Centered Goal-Setting and Treatment Outcomes
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, April 2012, Vol. 22, 28-35. doi:10.1044/nnsld22.1.28
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, April 2012, Vol. 22, 28-35. doi:10.1044/nnsld22.1.28

Shifting definitions of health and well-being, prompted by the World Health Organization's International Classification of Functioning (2001), have stimulated changes in traditional clinician-client relationships in rehabilitation. Among these changes, in keeping with the concept of client-centered care, is a trend toward more collaborative goal-setting and joint determination of intervention plans. Evidence suggests that supporting clients' autonomy in prioritizing personally meaningful goals leads to increased engagement in intervention, less emotional anxiety about the rehabilitation process, and improved treatment outcomes. Supporting people with aphasia in a process of collaborative goal formulation may also serve to alter treatment priorities so that they address more relevant communication challenges embedded in post-rehabilitation life.

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