Self-Anchored Rating Scales: Creating Partnerships for Post-Aphasia Change The self-anchored rating scale (SARS) is a technique used by systemic family counselors that has been applied to treating speech and language disorders, most recently aphasia. SARS aids the clinician in understanding the lived experience of the person with aphasia and members of his or her social support network. Skilled ... Article
Article  |   April 2012
Self-Anchored Rating Scales: Creating Partnerships for Post-Aphasia Change
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Lynn E. Fox
    Department of Speech & Hearing Sciences, Portland State University, Portland, OR
  • Mary A. Andrews
    Portland State University, Portland, OR
  • James Andrews
    Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, Illinois
    Department of Speech & Hearing Sciences, Portland State University, Portland, OR
  • Lynn E. Fox, PhD, CCC-SLP, is Associate Professor Emerita, Portland State University. Her research and clinical interests emphasize family-based intervention for individuals with neurogenic communication disorders.
    Lynn E. Fox, PhD, CCC-SLP, is Associate Professor Emerita, Portland State University. Her research and clinical interests emphasize family-based intervention for individuals with neurogenic communication disorders.×
  • Mary Andrews, MS, is a clinical member of the American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy (AAMFT). She directed the Family Center at Northern Illinois University. Dr. & Mrs. Andrews coauthored the text, Family Based Treatment in Communicative Disorders: A Systemic Approach.
    Mary Andrews, MS, is a clinical member of the American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy (AAMFT). She directed the Family Center at Northern Illinois University. Dr. & Mrs. Andrews coauthored the text, Family Based Treatment in Communicative Disorders: A Systemic Approach.×
  • James Andrews, PhD, is Professor Emeritus and former Chair of the Department of Communicative Disorders, Northern Illinois University. He is a Fellow of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association.
    James Andrews, PhD, is Professor Emeritus and former Chair of the Department of Communicative Disorders, Northern Illinois University. He is a Fellow of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association.×
  • © 2012 American Speech-Language-Hearing Association
Article Information
Language Disorders / Aphasia
Article   |   April 2012
Self-Anchored Rating Scales: Creating Partnerships for Post-Aphasia Change
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, April 2012, Vol. 22, 18-27. doi:10.1044/nnsld22.1.18
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, April 2012, Vol. 22, 18-27. doi:10.1044/nnsld22.1.18

The self-anchored rating scale (SARS) is a technique used by systemic family counselors that has been applied to treating speech and language disorders, most recently aphasia. SARS aids the clinician in understanding the lived experience of the person with aphasia and members of his or her social support network. Skilled use of SARS helps people with aphasia and their families identify reasonable therapy goals and shows how their opinions and actions contribute to achieving those goals. In this article, we describe five steps in the SARS process, as well as specific counseling techniques that help the clinician involve the person with aphasia and his or her family in all aspects of the therapeutic process. Case study data illustrate outcomes for one family, showing improvement in behaviors identified as important by a client, the client’s spouse, and their clinician.

Acknowledgments
The authors wish to thank the couple, referred to as Phillip and Grace, who agreed to participate in the therapy sessions we describe and who gave consent to us for use of their quotes. We also thank Bree Weinstein, the clinician in Phillip and Grace’s case study and formerly a student at Portland State University, who collected the data we report as part of her master’s thesis research.
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