CE Introduction The benefits of telerehabilitation methods are clear and exciting. As discussed in this issue of Perspectives, the ability to remotely deliver therapy increases access to intervention and supplemental practice, which can be instrumental in improving speech, language, and cognition. Although the capacity to provide intervention to clients at distant ... SIG News
SIG News  |   October 01, 2011
CE Introduction
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • McKay Moore Sohlberg
    Communication Disorders & Sciences, University of Oregon, Eugene, OR
Article Information
SIG News
SIG News   |   October 01, 2011
CE Introduction
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, October 2011, Vol. 21, 81-82. doi:10.1044/nnsld21.3.81
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, October 2011, Vol. 21, 81-82. doi:10.1044/nnsld21.3.81
The benefits of telerehabilitation methods are clear and exciting. As discussed in this issue of Perspectives, the ability to remotely deliver therapy increases access to intervention and supplemental practice, which can be instrumental in improving speech, language, and cognition. Although the capacity to provide intervention to clients at distant sites represents an invaluable advance in our field, we must remember that technology is the vehicle for delivering the therapy, not the actual therapy itself. We cannot evaluate the benefits of telerehabilitation divorced from its associated therapies.
The American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) formally supports the use of telecommunications to deliver professional services at a distance (ASHA, 2010). Professional services require skills possessed by licensed, trained speech-language pathologists (SLPs). Conducting assessments that lead to the selection of an appropriate intervention, monitoring treatment effects, and modifying intervention-based client performance data are all fundamental components of an effective therapy regimen, whether it is delivered face-to-face by an SLP or remotely by a computer. Scientific clinical decision-making is key to the provision of professional services. It is, thus, not possible to discuss the efficacy of telerehabilitation divorced from the process of rational clinical decision-making. The four articles included in this issue describe a range of applications for using telecommunications to deliver a primary intervention or provide supplementary practice, and all depend upon skilled SLPs engaged in a process of scientific clinical reasoning.
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