Telepractice Experiences in a University Training Clinic Telepractice is a rapidly growing means of providing remote speech-language pathology and audiology services to clients. The primary advantage of telepractice in speech-language therapy is that it improves the accessibility of services. Improved accessibility is important in serving not only clients in rural areas, but also those who are unable ... Article
Article  |   October 01, 2011
Telepractice Experiences in a University Training Clinic
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Barbara Rende
    University of Colorado-Boulder, Boulder, CO
  • Gail Ramsberger
    University of Colorado-Boulder, Boulder, CO
  • Barbara Rende earned her MA at the University of Arizona and her PhD at the University of Colorado. She has worked in the area of rehabilitation of adults with acquired swallowing, language, and cognitive impairments for over 25 years. Over the course of her career, she has provided clinical services, directed clinical programs, taught at the university level, presented at local and national professional meetings, and provided clinical mentorship to students and clinical fellows.
    Barbara Rende earned her MA at the University of Arizona and her PhD at the University of Colorado. She has worked in the area of rehabilitation of adults with acquired swallowing, language, and cognitive impairments for over 25 years. Over the course of her career, she has provided clinical services, directed clinical programs, taught at the university level, presented at local and national professional meetings, and provided clinical mentorship to students and clinical fellows.×
  • Gail Ramsberger is associate professor and chair of the Department of Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences at the University of Colorado, Boulder. Ramsberger's research focuses on the rehabilitation of persons with acquired neurologically based language and cognitive disorders. In her efforts to discover new and effective rehabilitation approaches, she seeks to understand the linguistic, cognitive, social, environmental, and emotional factors that contribute to communicative success. Her research has been funded by The National Institutes of Health, James S. McDonnell Foundation, and the National Science Foundation.
    Gail Ramsberger is associate professor and chair of the Department of Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences at the University of Colorado, Boulder. Ramsberger's research focuses on the rehabilitation of persons with acquired neurologically based language and cognitive disorders. In her efforts to discover new and effective rehabilitation approaches, she seeks to understand the linguistic, cognitive, social, environmental, and emotional factors that contribute to communicative success. Her research has been funded by The National Institutes of Health, James S. McDonnell Foundation, and the National Science Foundation.×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Professional Issues & Training / Telepractice & Computer-Based Approaches / Language Disorders / Aphasia / Articles
Article   |   October 01, 2011
Telepractice Experiences in a University Training Clinic
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, October 2011, Vol. 21, 120-129. doi:10.1044/nnsld21.3.120
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, October 2011, Vol. 21, 120-129. doi:10.1044/nnsld21.3.120

Telepractice is a rapidly growing means of providing remote speech-language pathology and audiology services to clients. The primary advantage of telepractice in speech-language therapy is that it improves the accessibility of services. Improved accessibility is important in serving not only clients in rural areas, but also those who are unable to visit the clinic because of physical disability. Telepractice may also make it easier for clients to engage in more intense therapy schedules, because the burdens associated with traveling to and from the clinic are removed. For these reasons, we suggested graduate students in speech-language pathology gain experience in telepractice delivery of services. This article describes our experience training graduate students in the use of telepractice delivery of speech-language therapy. Three different treatment protocols were used with nine different clients. In addition, important issues related to the use of telepractice are identified.

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