Treatment of Attention To Improve Conversational Success in Aphasia Being able to successfully engage in conversation is an important skill for most adults. When an adult has aphasia, this skill is affected. Traditionally, speech-language pathologists try to increase language skills in people with aphasia in an effort to ultimately improve performance in functional activities such as conversation. However, conversation ... Article
Article  |   June 01, 2011
Treatment of Attention To Improve Conversational Success in Aphasia
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Kathryn Y. Hardin
    University of Colorado at Boulder, Boulder Community Hospital, Boulder, CO, Boulder, CO
  • Gail Ramsberger
    University of Colorado at Boulder, Boulder, CO
  • Gail Ramsberger, ScD, CCC-SLP, BC-ANCDS is associate professor and chair of the Department of Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences at the University of Colorado, Boulder. Dr. Ramsberger's research focuses on the rehabilitation of persons with acquired neurologically based language and cognitive disorders. In her efforts to discover new and effective rehabilitation approaches, she seeks to understand the linguistic, cognitive, social, environmental, and emotional factors that contribute to communicative success. Her research has been funded by The National Institutes of Health, James S. McDonnell Foundation and the National Science Foundation.
    Gail Ramsberger, ScD, CCC-SLP, BC-ANCDS is associate professor and chair of the Department of Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences at the University of Colorado, Boulder. Dr. Ramsberger's research focuses on the rehabilitation of persons with acquired neurologically based language and cognitive disorders. In her efforts to discover new and effective rehabilitation approaches, she seeks to understand the linguistic, cognitive, social, environmental, and emotional factors that contribute to communicative success. Her research has been funded by The National Institutes of Health, James S. McDonnell Foundation and the National Science Foundation.×
  • Kathryn Y. Hardin, MA, CCC-SLP is a speech-language pathologist at Boulder Community Hospital in Boulder, CO. Ms. Hardin received her MA in Communication Disorders from the University of Colorado, Boulder. Her clinical interests are in the evaluation and treatment of neurogenic communication disorders in an out-patient rehabilitation setting. She has specific interests in mild traumatic brain injury and cognitive deficits associated with cancer treatments.
    Kathryn Y. Hardin, MA, CCC-SLP is a speech-language pathologist at Boulder Community Hospital in Boulder, CO. Ms. Hardin received her MA in Communication Disorders from the University of Colorado, Boulder. Her clinical interests are in the evaluation and treatment of neurogenic communication disorders in an out-patient rehabilitation setting. She has specific interests in mild traumatic brain injury and cognitive deficits associated with cancer treatments.×
Article Information
Normal Language Processing / Language Disorders / Aphasia / Articles
Article   |   June 01, 2011
Treatment of Attention To Improve Conversational Success in Aphasia
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, June 2011, Vol. 21, 72-77. doi:10.1044/nnsld21.2.72
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, June 2011, Vol. 21, 72-77. doi:10.1044/nnsld21.2.72

Being able to successfully engage in conversation is an important skill for most adults. When an adult has aphasia, this skill is affected. Traditionally, speech-language pathologists try to increase language skills in people with aphasia in an effort to ultimately improve performance in functional activities such as conversation. However, conversation is a complex communication task that places demands not only on linguistic processing, but also on higher level cognitive processing. In this paper, we describe our initial efforts to improve conversational success in people with aphasia when training their attention on simple non-linguistic computer tasks.

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