Alexia Acquired dyslexia (i.e., alexia) is a reading disorder in previously literate adults that is caused by brain damage. It can accompany the general language disturbance of aphasia, but can be an isolated result of neurological injury. In recent years, many studies have been published demonstrating the effectiveness of treatment for ... Article
Article  |   April 01, 2002
Alexia
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Margaret Greenwald
    Wayne State University, Detroit, MI
  • Paige George
    Wayne State University, Detroit, MI
Article Information
Language Disorders / Aphasia / Reading & Writing Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Articles
Article   |   April 01, 2002
Alexia
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, April 2002, Vol. 12, 4-13. doi:10.1044/nnsld12.1.4
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, April 2002, Vol. 12, 4-13. doi:10.1044/nnsld12.1.4
Acknowledgments
This work was supported by the Department of Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology in the College of Science, Wayne State University, and by a grant from the National Institutes of Health.
Dr. Margaret Greenwald is an assistant professor in the Dept. of Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology and an adjunct assistant professor in the Dept. of Neurology at Wayne State University in Detroit, Michigan. Paige George is a doctoral student in the Dept. of Audiology and Speech Sciences at Michigan State University in East Lansing, Michigan and a research technician in the Aphasia and Neurocognitive Disorders Laboratory at Wayne State University.
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