Agnosia Agnosia is defined as an inability to recognize a stimulus through a particular sensory modality, often as a result of brain damage, despite relatively normal intellectual capacity and preserved peripheral sensory mechanisms (Carlson, 1994). Brain injury can disrupt recognition of familiar auditory (Clarke, Bellman, Meuli, Assal, & Steck, 2000), tactile ... Article
Article  |   April 01, 2002
Agnosia
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Margaret Greenwald
    Wayne State University, Detroit, MI
  • Judy Mikola
    Wayne State University, Detroit, MI
Article Information
Professional Issues & Training / Language Disorders / Aphasia / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Traumatic Brain Injury / Articles
Article   |   April 01, 2002
Agnosia
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, April 2002, Vol. 12, 25-30. doi:10.1044/nnsld12.1.25
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, April 2002, Vol. 12, 25-30. doi:10.1044/nnsld12.1.25
Acknowledgments
This work was supported by the Department of Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology in the College of Science, Wayne State University, and by a grant from the National Institutes of Health.
Dr. Margaret Greenwald is an assistant professor in the Department of Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology and an adjunct assistant professor in the Department of Neurology at Wayne State University. Judy Mikola is a doctoral student at Wayne State University and a speech-language pathologist at Saint Joseph Mercy Hospital in Ann Arbor.
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