Sensory Integration Therapy Sensory integration therapy is based on the original research of Jean Ayres. Ayres identified patterns of sensory motor dysfunction in children with a variety of special needs and hypothesized five syndromes of sensory dysfunction (1965, 1966a, 1966b, 1969). She defined sensory integration as the organization and processing of sensory ... Article
Article  |   June 01, 2002
Sensory Integration Therapy
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Eileen Abrahamsen
    Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA
Article Information
Special Populations / Autism Spectrum / Language Disorders / Reading & Writing Disorders / Articles
Article   |   June 01, 2002
Sensory Integration Therapy
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, June 2002, Vol. 12, 20-24. doi:10.1044/nnsld12.2.20
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, June 2002, Vol. 12, 20-24. doi:10.1044/nnsld12.2.20
Sensory integration therapy is based on the original research of Jean Ayres. Ayres identified patterns of sensory motor dysfunction in children with a variety of special needs and hypothesized five syndromes of sensory dysfunction (1965, 1966a, 1966b, 1969). She defined sensory integration as the organization and processing of sensory information for specific functional use. Ayres hypothesized that sensory integration dysfunction contributed to communication and learning disorders observed in children and that facilitating higher levels of sensory integration through sensory integration therapy might ameliorate such deficits.
Sensory integration (SI) therapy has been practiced mainly by occupational therapists for over 30 years. As collaboration between speech-language pathologists and occupational therapists has increased, especially in early intervention and preschool populations, speech-language pathologists have become increasingly interested in sensory integration therapy. Frequently, a practicum placement or a first job is the speech-language pathologist’s first introduction to this therapy approach. Many speech-language pathologists find this therapy approach very appealing. The concepts seem logical, the activities are often fun, and collaboration is rather effortless. Speech language pathology, however, is a science-based discipline, so speech-language pathologists must examine the scientific evidence supporting therapeutic approaches before adopting them.
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