Acquisition of Culture From a Developmental Perspective How did I get to be me? How did my biological systems interact with my personal life experiences to shape my essence? If my life had been different, what knowledge might I have now? To find examples of “culture,” we only need to look around us. “Speech, language, and communication ... Article
Article  |   April 01, 2005
Acquisition of Culture From a Developmental Perspective
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Mary Blake Huer
    Department of Human Communication Studies, California State University, Fullerton, CA
Article Information
Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Articles
Article   |   April 01, 2005
Acquisition of Culture From a Developmental Perspective
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, April 2005, Vol. 15, 7-15. doi:10.1044/nnsld15.1.7
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, April 2005, Vol. 15, 7-15. doi:10.1044/nnsld15.1.7
How did I get to be me?
How did my biological systems interact with my personal life experiences to shape my essence?
If my life had been different, what knowledge might I have now?
To find examples of “culture,” we only need to look around us. “Speech, language, and communication are embedded in culture” (Battle, 1998, p. 4). We find examples of culture in the common sense explanations of children when asked a question. Culture is revealed through the telling of anecdotal stories by older persons. Scholars may consider the cultural tools of words, beliefs, books, and computers. Cognitive archaeologists examine the culture of ritual, art, and technology (cultural symbols) as related to cognitive causes and effects (Sperber & Hirschfeld, 1999). Yet explaining how each of us becomes a “cultural human being” with complex communication strategies is not simple. There are still many unknowns regarding how each of us acquires our various cultural traits. Interestingly, theorists’ views regarding the development of culture often reflect differences in their own life experiences, academic preparations, and cultural lenses.
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