Why Is Yogurt Good for You? Because It Has Live Cultures Learning about and understanding any culture different from our own can be a daunting task. Cultural sensitivity and competence are a necessity for clinicians and researchers given the increasingly diverse clientele served by speech-language pathologists, audiologists, and speech-language and hearing scientists. So, where does one begin when attempting to ... Article
Article  |   April 2005
Why Is Yogurt Good for You? Because It Has Live Cultures
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Nidhi Mahendra
    ASHA Multicultural Issues Board, 2004
  • John Ribera
    ASHA Multicultural Issues Board, 2004
  • Rose Sevcik
    ASHA Multicultural Issues Board, 2004
  • Richard Adler
    ASHA Multicultural Issues Board, 2004
  • Li-Rong Lilly Cheng
    ASHA Multicultural Issues Board, 2004
  • Elise Davis-McFarland
    ASHA Multicultural Issues Board, 2004
  • Vicki Deal-Williams
    ASHA Multicultural Issues Board, 2004
  • Debra Garrett
    ASHA Multicultural Issues Board, 2004
  • Luis F. Riquelme
    ASHA Multicultural Issues Board, 2004
  • Toni Salisbury
    ASHA Multicultural Issues Board, 2004
  • Whitney Schneider
    ASHA Multicultural Issues Board, 2004
  • Alberto Villanueva
    ASHA Multicultural Issues Board, 2004
  • © 2005 American Speech-Language-Hearing Association
Article Information
Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / Professional Issues & Training / Articles
Article   |   April 2005
Why Is Yogurt Good for You? Because It Has Live Cultures
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, April 2005, Vol. 15, 3-7. doi:10.1044/nnsld15.1.3
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, April 2005, Vol. 15, 3-7. doi:10.1044/nnsld15.1.3
Learning about and understanding any culture different from our own can be a daunting task. Cultural sensitivity and competence are a necessity for clinicians and researchers given the increasingly diverse clientele served by speech-language pathologists, audiologists, and speech-language and hearing scientists. So, where does one begin when attempting to understand and become aware of the many cultural variables that can influence a clinical interaction? Through this article, we hope to answer this question by providing a framework for understanding cultural diversity and the dire need for cultural competence in our professions.
The goal of this article is to stimulate discussion and reflection about diversity-related issues, including, for example, differences in clients’ perceptions of and attitudes towards testing and treatment related to swallowing disorders.
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