CE Introduction In the United States, many individuals speak a language other than, or in addition to, English. Consider that in the 2000 U.S. Census, 18% of the total population aged 5 years and over, or 47 million people, reported they spoke a language other than English at home. Of these individuals, ... SIG News
SIG News  |   June 01, 2005
CE Introduction
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SIG News
SIG News   |   June 01, 2005
CE Introduction
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, June 2005, Vol. 15, 2-3. doi:10.1044/nnsld15.2.2
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, June 2005, Vol. 15, 2-3. doi:10.1044/nnsld15.2.2
In the United States, many individuals speak a language other than, or in addition to, English. Consider that in the 2000 U.S. Census, 18% of the total population aged 5 years and over, or 47 million people, reported they spoke a language other than English at home. Of these individuals, approximately 21 million indicated that they did not speak English “very well” (Shin & Bruno, 2003). With more than 20 million speakers, Spanish is by far the most common “second language” spoken in the U.S. Other languages include Vietnamese, Mandarin, Cantonese, Tagalog, Arabic, French Creole, Russian, Urdu, and Hmong, as well as hundreds of others. The National Aphasia Association (n.d.) estimates that one in every 250 people in the U.S. has an acquired aphasia. If this estimate holds across all language and cultural groups, this would mean that approximately 188,000 individuals with aphasia in the U.S speak languages other than, or in addition to, English. The number of bilingual or non-English speaking individuals with acquired aphasia in the U.S. is likely to continue to increase over the next decades.
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