Providing Augmentative and Alternative Communication Treatment to Persons With Progressive Nonfluent Aphasia Augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) intervention offers people diagnosed with progressive nonfluent aphasia (PNFA) an opportunity to continue to communicate even as verbal expression declines. To date, there are no well-controlled studies reporting the effectiveness of AAC intervention with people who present with PNFA. Further, there is a pressing need ... Article
Article  |   April 01, 2010
Providing Augmentative and Alternative Communication Treatment to Persons With Progressive Nonfluent Aphasia
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Melanie Fried-Oken
    Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR
  • Charity Rowland
    Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR
  • Chris Gibbons
    Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR
Article Information
Augmentative & Alternative Communication / Language Disorders / Aphasia / Articles
Article   |   April 01, 2010
Providing Augmentative and Alternative Communication Treatment to Persons With Progressive Nonfluent Aphasia
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, April 2010, Vol. 20, 21-25. doi:10.1044/nnsld20.1.21
SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, April 2010, Vol. 20, 21-25. doi:10.1044/nnsld20.1.21
Abstract

Augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) intervention offers people diagnosed with progressive nonfluent aphasia (PNFA) an opportunity to continue to communicate even as verbal expression declines. To date, there are no well-controlled studies reporting the effectiveness of AAC intervention with people who present with PNFA. Further, there is a pressing need for evidence about specific AAC intervention tools, techniques, and training protocols for persons with PNFA and their communication partners. We have engaged in research studies at the Oregon Health & Science University to quantify low-tech AAC supports for people with PNFA in highly controlled, as well as naturalistic, dyadic conversations. Preliminary results suggest that AAC provides strong lexical support for people with PNFA during conversation. We predict that training participants and their partners how to use personalized, low-tech communication boards will lead to reduced conversational scaffolding by partners and prolonged effective communication as the disease course progresses. Clinical implications and future directions of our research are discussed.

Acknowledgment
This research is supported by grants #H133G080162 and #H133E080011 (Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center in Communication Enhancement) from the National Institute for Disability and Rehabilitation Research, U.S. Department of Education.
Become a SIG Affiliate
Pay Per View
Entire SIG 2 Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders content & archive
24-hour access
This Issue
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access
We've Changed Our Publication Model...
The 19 individual SIG Perspectives publications have been relaunched as the new, all-in-one Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups.